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Full text of "The Boston school song book : published under the sanction of the Boston Academy of Music"

THE 



BOSTON SCHOOL SONG BOOK. 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE SANCTION OF THE BOSTON ACADEMY OF MU^TC 



ORIGINAL AND SELECTED. 



BY 

LOWELL MASON. 



BOSTON: 
J. H. WILKINS, & R. B. CARTER. 

1841. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1840, by Melvin Lord, in the Clerk's 
Office of the District Court of Massachusetts. 



PREFACE. 



When music is introduced into schools, it should be the leading object to give the children 
3 thorough knowledge of its elementary principles, and not merely to teach them to sing songs 
by rote. This can be done by the use of the Black Board,* proceeding according to the 
r < Manual, "t without any book in the hands of the pupils. But in addition to elementary 
instruction it is also desirable to introduce the singing of suitable songs, (at first by rote) as a 
rebef from the severer study of the e'ements and as an exercise for the voice ; also, as a means of 
improving the general taste and style of performance. To furnish music for this purpose is 
Che object of tne present work. It will be found to contain a sufficient variety of songs on 
interesting subjects, nearly all of which, as well the music as the poetry, are new. The attempt 
hds been made to introduce such words only as would probably interest the pupils ; and tne 
riora) tendency of which should be always unexceptionable. 

I * addition to songs, many rounds, sentences, and lessons have been inserted. In genera! 
it may be best that the rounds should be sung by solo voices, selected from the most advanced 
pupils. If sung in chorus the parts should be equal. 

The questions at the end of the book, are such as the pupils will be able to answer if the 
instruction has been thorough. It is hardly possible that pupils can answer them unless the 
subjects to which they relate are understood. Let it not be supposed, however, that all which 
is implied in these questions can be taught in a few months. Children cannot be made to 
understand the subject of music without a long course of instruction 5 but there is time enough 
between the age of 10 and 16 for the acquisition, without interfering with other studies. Where 
schools are kept for so short a time, that onlyja part of the course can be given, the teacher 
will use his discretion as to what should be omitted. In general it is advisable that the instruc- 
tion be thorough as far as it goes. In some cases when the term is very short ; it may not 
te expedient to introduce any thing beyond what is implied in the first twelve chapters, ieav- 
>r.e the whole subject of transposition for future instruction. But while there maybe manv 
tcnoota where from the limited time devoted to music, it may be impossible to introduce all 
the subjects to which these questions relate, yet it is certain that to answer all of them cor- 
rectly and understanding^ requires no more than a ihorough knowledge of the mere element- 
ary principles of the art, and no one who undertakes to study music should be satisfied with 
less than this. 



* Much assistance may be derived also from the " Musical Exercises," [recently prepared by the 
awtlior^ printed in characters sufficiently large, to be seen across the school room, and adapted to 
tiie Manual. These exercises are used in the Boston Grammar Schools, where music is a regular 
study. 

t Manual of Instruction in the Elements of Vocal Music, by L. Mascwu 



CONTENTS. 



SONGS. 

Adieu, 72 

Ail hail to our favorite Ma), 84 
Always some good, . . 78 
Away ! o'er bright sunny 

meadows, .... 24 
Away to the garden, . . 37 

Bel! Chimes 14 

Bliss is hovering, . . . .98 
Chant, " I will lift up," . 116 
Change, (parting at school.) 94 
Come and see how happily, 97 
Come, May ! thou lovely, 5 



Come seek the bower . 90 

Contentment, 40 

Departure of Winter, . 10 

Evening Song- 16 

First day of May, . . .110 

Friendship, 28 

God of Love, .... 31 
Greenville, .... 115 

Home, 36 

In the cottage, . . . 10 1 

Marlow 113 

May Song, 30 

Morning Song, .... 4 
My native land. .... 22 
New year song, ... 96 

Old Hundred 112 

Our Father land, ... 86 
Patriotic song, . . . .64 

Peace, 7 

Pleasures of childhood, . 34 
Rich, after dull, &c. . . 60 
Singing and study, • . 92 

Sicily, 114 

Song of the free, ... 62 
Spring evening, .... 8 
Spring song, .... 32 
Spring wishes, .... 42 
Summer song, .... 26 



Sunrise, 23 

The beautiful flower, . . 44 
The fading leaf, .... 27 
The flowers of the lea, . 84 
The fount of joy, . . .66 
The grove, . , . . 100 
The hobby horse, ... 93 
The journey, .... 12 
The lovely May is coming. 88 
The love of truth, . . . 18 
The might with the right, . 58 

The Pilot, 68 

The Reapers, . . . 108 

The Rain, 20 

The Sail, 74 

The Singer's song, . . 52 
The Sun and the Brook, . 50 

The Stars, 76 

The Singing meeting, . . 87 
The way to contentment. 70 
The way worn traveler, . 80 

The Wish, 6 

The Swiss toy girl, . . 102 
To the good cause, . . 46 
To our mother, . . . 106 
'Tis near the spot, ... 43 
Vacation song, . . . .56 
We know a land, ... 54 
Welcome to school, ... 28 

ROUNDS. 
Again the summer's near, 65 
Beauty blooms, . . . .61 
Before you make a prom- 
ise, 114 

How sweet to be roaming, 77 

If your ear, 75 

Lawrence ! 21 

Let us endeavor, . , .55 
Let your pleasure, . . 92 
Love of truth, .... 85 



Love your neighbor, . . 69 
Morning is breaking, . . 63 
Now let notes of joy, . . 47 
Over mountain, .... 9 

Sing it over, 22 

Sing we another, .... 73 
Spirits bright ! ... 113 
Scotland's burning, ... 29 
Sweetly now at evening 

hour, 83 

'Twas well, 11 

Thomas and Andrew, . . 17 
Time, how fast, ... 21 
The bell that's in, ... 26 
The bell doth toll, ... 45 
The noblest hero, . . .35 
To spend the day well, . 41 
Time and tide, . . . .71 
The hour is come, ... 79 
To the praise ot truth, . . 99 

White sand, 105 

What you've to do, . . 116 
When a weary ta.sk, . . 35 

SENTENCES. 
All things round us, . . 49 
Art thou disappointed, . . 67 
Be to others, .... 95 
Beauty blooms, . . . .61 

Better poor, 17 

Birds are singing, ... 6 
Firm, with heart and hand, 19 
God said, &c, .... 15 
God commands, . . . .51 
Hast thou a sorrow, . . 39 
He that would thrive, . . 26 



LESSONS. 
Pages 33, 53, 81,85,89,95, 
97, 101. 102. 105, 109, 115. 



THE 



BOSTON SCHOOL SONG BOOK. 



Koderato. 



MORNING SONG 




1 



3m 



l 



I 



1 . Morn -ing's gold-en 

2. Well, I'm rea-dy, 



light 
qui - 



r r r ?~ZJ>- ? 

is break-ing, Tints of beau-ty paint the skies ; 
et rest- ing Has restored my wea - ried powers 5 



1 1 



— j — ^- 



Morning's feather'd choir are wak-ing 
I'll a-gain, all sloth re - sist -in. 



ing, Bid - dm 



f 



mg me 
bor thro ; 



from sleep a - rise, 
the day's bright hours. 




But with thanks let me remember 
Him .who gave me quiet sleep; 
J^et me all his mercies number, 
And his precepts gladly keep. 



When I leave the downy pillow, 
Which so oft has borne my head, 
Sure it's right a time to hallow 
To the hand that kept my bed. 



Let me never prove ungrateful, 
Let me never thankless be ; 
From a sin so base and hateful, 
May I be forever free. 



Allegretto 



mm 



! thou lovely lingerer." 



<{ Come, May 



MOZART. 



f 3f 

*^ ^ I p I ^ 

1. Come, May ! »hou lovely lin-gerer ! And deck the groves a 

2. True, win-ter days have ma-nyAnd many a dear de - 

3. But oh, when comes the sea-son, For mer-ry birds to sing, 



izzafcj 



li-ht : 



And 
We 
How 



^^^^^ 



let thy sil - very streamlets Me - an - der through the 
fro! - ic in the snow-drifts, And then — the win - ter 
sweet to roam the mea-dows 7 And drink the breeze of 



plain j 
night, 



We 
A - 

Then 





0—0- 




— 


-1 — 










1 


L. J 




L ^ L 



,^|z:gz3z:SE^ii:g:^ 



I ^1 

fair 5 Sweet 

storm, When 

come, sweet May ! and bring us The flow' - ret fresh and fair j We 



long once more to ga - ther The flow' - rets fresh and 
round the fire we clus - ter, Nor heed the whist- lin: 



g\— 

H \ 1 



-c- 



I 



_ i ^ . . p . i wp 



Lad ^ - l wp 

May ! Once more to wan - der, And breathe the balmy air. 

allwith-out is drea - ry. Our hearts are bright and w arm, 
long once more to wan - der And breathe the balmv air. 

» ■ • 1 r i =fc 



» 



I 



THE WISH. 




-^-0—0—0- 



to 



1 . Were I a bird, I'd fly, O'er sea, and through the sky — How would I roam ! 











1 — 






















-t- 


hi 








- 
— • 


... 












But since this can-not be ; Here I will wan-der free, Fields of my home. 



Q5£ 







Yet ah! how sweet 'twould be 
Under the orange tree; 

Deep shady grove ! 
Might I hut wander there, 
Breathing thy balmy air 

Region of Love! 



But 'twas not meant, I know, 
We should be birds, and so 

I'll not repine: 
Thine I will ever be, 
Home of my infancy! 

Ever be thine! 



SENTENCE. 




Birds are sing-ing, Hopping ; springing, Cheer-ful - ly from bough to bough 3 

-Ufa N : , ■ 1^ ■ 




V — b*- 



— ^ — ^_ 



Streams are flo\v-ing ; Blos-soms blow-ing, No ex - cuse for dull - ness now. 



PEACE. 7 




2. Thou hast thrown a smile of beauty, 
O'er the meadow, hill and grove; 



Thou hast quickened us to duty, 

Thou hast warmed our hearts to love. 

3. Ours is now each smiling flower, 

Ours the lofty mountain pine, 
Ours the fruit-tree's golden shower, 
And the close entwining vine. 

4. Still stay with us, still replenish 

Fields with fruit, ourselves with love; 
Discord and dissension banish, 
Peaceful spirit from above. 



SPRING EVENING. 



Andante. p>=g M> mmd mmm 



What more fine can be, What mo r e fall 
When the bios - - soms fair, Per- fume all 



the 




1*5 J I sf^t^ ^ 

, — £ — pL_-_^__I 



Than in spring when day's de 
And the wes - tern clouds are 



clin - ing; > 
shin - ing 3 \ 



When the birds so 



is! 



i 




— &— 9 -0-- L -&-£-\ — &- l ^-*- 9 - 9 - L m L 



fond-ly twit-ter ; And the sharp shrill crickets tit- ter : Honey - la - den bees. 



3 



S f— •-^ih 1 - 



Mur - mur with the breeze j Oh ! what time for thought is fit - ter. 



:fz: 



m 



SPRING EVENING. 



9 



2 

Then we leave our home, 

To the fields we roam, 
And we sit amongst the haying; 

Hear the pleasant sound, 

Of the birds around, 
Or some far off flute that's playing; 
Hear the loud and croaking chorus, 
From the sedgy marsh before us: 

All the meadows ring; 

While the songs they sing 
Back to summer thoughts restore us. 

3 

But 'tis night! away! 

For we must not stay 
Chatting here so late together. 

Yet 'twere sweet to stay, 

Mid the new mown hay, 
All the night, in summer weather! 
Time is o'er for chat and dancing; 
Now the gentle moon advancing, 

Calls the stars out all, 

Sets them, great and small, 
In the clear blue heavens glancing. 



ROUND FOR FOUR OR EIGHT VOICES. 











— 1 — 










®— 4- 1 1— 1 






:zt— n : 






9 


— 9 









»» 


*>- 






1- w a* • 


o 




M _* — 



way. 



10 



DEPARTURE OF WINTER. 



Hlod era to. f 



0- m -0-P 0- -0- ,*\* * ,* f -0- 

j C Old winter! now farewell my friend ! Full many a merry meeting 1 , \ 

' ( Which thou hast brought us now must end j We wait the spring's warm greeting. 





r 9 r ^ 

Take hence what was 



dear; But bring it back 



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tzzbzztzzti^zz^zzizzrfjzzzt^tzrbzi 



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?\ CHORUS 

— — 



0- 



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oth- er year : We'll not be sighing, Thou art not dying ; 



I Soli. 

— ' h frta h ^-h — j*— f*-f 

.g r ^,_IpZZ-_.^_I m-jjzwrf- 

1*3 Ls* I 1^ 1^ L< 



S^zfzfrz^ZLZ^zpzfqzzjzz^qzzt] 



«*-»*- 



lafcafcatatafci 



1 ^ t" ^ 

A-dieu ! we meet a - - 

l*z*zpz*zf 

iCzUz^z^zi 




-f-f 



1 ******* i ^ 

- gain, We'll not be sigh-ing, Thou art not dy-ing ; A - dieu ! we meet a 

: T _-_...---__ T ^_-- --, 



^ fc^ ^ 



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at* 



zjzi^zpzpzp- 



I 



1 — 



DEPARTURE OF WINTER. 



11 



_ — f _.I4Z_^_ i( ,_C =:;c l #- J --a^i-a-*- 1 -^ 



4 



5 



CHORUS P 

H | f> » » 



gain ! A-dieu ! we meet a 



gain 



I & * * 

dieu : we meet a 



I 

gain. 



Old winter! now farewell my friend! 

Full many a merry meeting, 
Which thou hast brought us, now must end, 

We wait the spring's warm greeting. 
And Oh! the spring how sweet will be 
The harmony and melody 

Of birds in chorus, 

Rejoicing o'er us: 
But we shall meet again. 



When wearied nature needs repose, 

Thou'lt come, thy pleasures bringing; 
Then round the crackling fire we'll close 

Our winter-ballads singing, 
Or on the ice by night or day, 
On flying skates we'll glide away. 

So I'll not sorrow, 

'Tis but tomorrow, 
And we shall meet again. 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 



ri-pzpzq::: 



-0—\- 



Twas well be - gun, ? Twill soon be done. 



Yes, 



yes, 



THE JOURNEY. 



Allegro. 



1. A youth, re - solved to see the world, Set out on foot to 



And sought, as round and round he whirled, Most 



go: 



_pt — 



□fczatzrt: 



-4 —4— 4- 



* d: 1 -*" ^r 1 :*;:--^-*-*-^-^? 1 

• L s r k I l 



wise and great to grow. 



* U 

His sto - ry is as true, is as 



jjj ^ ^ 



1- — — f^- 




true as the gun. Go on then, 



THE JOURNEY. 13 




2. " My first jaunt, then, was to the pole, 
Where all is ice and snow, 



Where naught can stand the frost, but soul, 
Nor tree, nor plant can grow." 
Chorus: — His story is, Sec. 

3. " Such cold as this I ne'er could bear, 

So 'way I turned my feet, 
Till 'twas so hot, 'twould singe one's hair, 
And make you die of heat." 
Chorus : — His story is, Sec. 

4. u And when I'd got some short repast, 

To stay my appetite, 
I turned my course, and journeyed fast, 
Nor staid a single nioht." 
Chorus: — His story is, See. 

5. " I next arrived at Mexico, # 

Where silver is so thick; 
Now here, says 1, I guess I know, 
I'll fill my bag right quick." 
Chorus: — His story is, Sec. 

6. "So round I went, from pole to pole, 

To see this wondrous world; 
Till back I came, to that same goal, 
From which I had been whirled." 
Chorus: — His btory is as true, is as true, as the gun, 

And more he could tell, but he now has done — but, 8cc. 



14 



BELL-CHIMES. 



Allegro. 



3=t 



C5_ 



1. Wake ye bells, from ev - ery e - choing- stee - pie ! Broth - - er 



J- 



m 



1 f- z » % -f- i » tstr 



!x*zfzz*z: 



voi - ces, wake ! with loud re - 
0. ■ - 




ply. Greet the hearts 



:*zz«; 



of 
& T 



blaz - ing- high— 



pco - ple ; Free-dom's flame is 



izzzzz^z -# — wh~ zif : 



g=^-±=tzzi5=z|z: 

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— J-- f » v ^ r r-^-J_^__^zt_t^ 4 _zt_g__z:_i._ 



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Free-dom's flame is 



blaz - ing- high, is 



BELL-CHIMES. 



15 



Wake, while thousand hearts, as one, are beating, 

Far and wide proclaim their jubilee; 
Speed thro' hill and vale our greeting, 

Tell to all the world: We're free.:|j 

We're free— we're free. 

3 

Say, we've fought the battle for opinion; 

Say, we dare to look around, above; 
All we feel, we speak; dominion — 

There is none we own, but love. :j| 
But love — but love. 

4 

Wake, ye bells! your chimes are blithe as morning, 
When its breath makes all the world seem new; 

Yet a sound of Sabbath-warning, 

Blending with them, says: Be true!:]! 
Be true — be true. 



SENTENCE. 



V 



=£1 



— I* — 



' , 



& 



God said : " let there be light ! 

f _^ 1 

■0 J -0- 



God said i u Let there be 



H f5?_ 



h 



iight !" 



AND THERE WAS LIGHT! 



16 



EVENING SONG. 



MUSIC BY ZELTER. 



AndHiitc. 



J & & & UP ii P I r * 



^ ^ & & & & ^ 

2 ( proud ty> O sun, art thou sink - ing ; In the bright firmament 

^ Mountain and clouds art thou tin g - in g, Bril-liant with gold - en 



pe^-- 



-r— 



A 4« 



Szz^;5:.-3;i:tz*z^Ei=?z=i=z*z 
— jfhj: A 



iZZ* 



low ; ) 
glow j J 



Bright- ly the stars are all twink - ling, 



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— fa — —fa — fa — fa — fa — 



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Each in its love -li - est 



light. . 



fffff 

Now in the dim light-ed 



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gzf ^ I V % f i -f JS f - P J* / F J. «F„ , k 
^ i - — ^ £ £ * p 

dis - - - - tance Com - eth the sweet peace- ml night. 



SB* 



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^zTzzzzzjz 



afez^ s s s *■ 



—I — e 



ft 



EVENING SONG. 



17 



2 

Now hath the night-breeze awakened, 
Stirring the leaves in the bowers. 

Linden its perfume is spending 
White with its silvery flowers. 

3 

Thus in our songs we will praise thee, 
Peaceful and loveliest night! 

While the fair queen of the heavens, 
Sheds all around us her light. 



ROUND FOR FOUR OR EIGHT VOICES. 




4 4\* 





Tho - mas and An- drew and Ja - bez all met to - geth - er in 









—G » 




— t — r— 




w • 


— & 


mm 


:zf=— : 


i 


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- 1 r r-.: 

-* « 9 



chit chat 5 



Sto 



ries of this and of that did they 



111=111111 



V a- 9 

tell, 'till their hearts all went pit pat. 



SENTENCE. 







rl— —1 r 




Bet- ter poor my 


whole life long, 


- ^ 1 — 1 

"~ 9 • J 

Than to do my 


neigh-bor vroag 



I 2 1 



THE LOVE OF TRUTH. 



n 



o 

My footsteps lead, truth, and mould my will. 
In word and deed my duty to fulfill: 

Dishonest arts, and selfish aims to truth can ne'er belong, 
No deed of mine, shall be a deed of wrong. 

3 

The strength of youth, we see it soon decay, 
But strong is truth, and stronger every day: 

Though falsehood seem a mighty power which we in vain assail, 
The power of truth will in the end prevail. 

4 

My days of youth tho' not from folly free, 
I prize the truth, the more the world I see. 

I'll keep the straight and narrow path, and lead where-e'er it may, 
The voice of truth I'll follow and obey. 



SENTENCE. 



/ 



Firm, with heart and hand, 

ff. 



Wov - en 



I 



ff 



be the band For 



thee, 



1 



3 



I 



'or thee, 



Fa - ther land 



THE RAIN. 



SCHADE. 



Andante. ^ 

±i L.J J 



-I 



-J— 

^9- 



I 



1. Sec, o'er yon - dcr mountains, Moves the mis - ty rain, 



-o- 

-Y-- 



3: 



Pass -ing from heavVs foun - tains, Bless- ings on the plain. 













1 h 


— 


^ 


-h- 


^ i — ^ — 

- p — h— 


— ^_ .a — 




I I J 

Now's the time for grow - - ing; Quick-ly then be sow 



ing ! 



-a v-s 



i 



—0 



m 

~f- 



-Cr- 



V '\ 



Let the well- tilled field . 



r 1 t 

Rich a- bun-dance yield. 



SEE 



THE HA IN. 21 

O 

Rich or poor, what matter? 

Each is here for good: 
Good seeds let him scatter 

In contented mood. 
For ye share together 

Sunshine and wet weather, 
Heaven these blessings gives 

To each one that lives. 
3 

Let the sage so knowing, 

On his wisdom build; 
We still planting, ploughing, 

Wait what God hath willed. 
'Tis while heaven befriendeth, 

Rain and sunshine sendeth, 
That the verdure thrives: 

God the blessing gives. 



ROUND FOR FOUR OR SIX VOICES. 




Law rence ! Law - - - - rcnee ! Take your grist and go right 



$r r r *>, Jif m^ r rip, r rn 

straight to mill, And see, my boy, that not a bit you spill. 



ROUND FOR TWO VOICES. 



22 



Allegro 



MY NATIVE LAND. 

I 




i I i I i J i 

O land of good that gave me birth, My love - ly, na - tive land 3 



m 



ZtiZJt 



.0—0—0—0. 




-e — -• 

j F„epeat /. 



a - midst the great of earth, Thy name shall ev - er stand. 





h^— * — I— 




* -*-\ — n 


-0 .» — ±-1- 






=t=l — * 






\ r i jl*f- 




2 




4 



I love the man that honors thee, 
I well approve his choice, 

To live and die among the free, 
A friend of freedom's cause. 



I love those laws that chime with 
And scorn to favor wrong; [truth, 

That bless in age, and guard in youth, 
And wake the widow's song. 



3 5 
I love the stream of mental light, May all the good that heav'n can 

That flows amidst thy hills, Be destined e'er to thee; [send, 

Hove the spire of towering height, May Zion's strength thy walls de- 

That says, " Here Zion dwells." And keep thee ever free. [fend 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 




Sing it o-ver ; With your might, Never leave it, Never leave it, Till 'tis right. 



SUNRISE. 



MOZART. 23 



Allegretto. Pia, 



1. See where the ris-ingsun, In splen-oor decks the skies, His dai- ly 



£3E 



For, "s Pia. 



course be-srun. Haste, a 



nJ^i - - rise. Oh, come with me where violets bloom. And 



zt: 



zmzrz^^zpftzfzlt^i 



rr-l 

fill the atr wuh sweet perfume, And wnere, like diamonds to the sight, Dew-drops sparkle 



* 1- 



bright. 

— 0-2 



2. Fair is the face of morn; 

Why should your eyelids keep 
Closed when the night is gone? 

W ake from your sleep ! 
Oh, who would slumber in his bed 

When darkness from his couch has fled ; 
And when the lark ascends on high, 

Warbling songs of joy ? 
Fair is the face, &.c. 



21 



s 



AWAY O'ER BRIGHT SUNNY MEADOWS. 

Lively. 




afczatziat 



r r r r 

I \0 \p \+ 

- way o'er bright sun ■ 

- way the clus - ter - 



4- 



ny 
mg 



~9 

* u * 

mea-dows ! A - way o 7 er 

bow - er, Cool shades and 




fra - grance yields. ) 



Be - neath th'en - - twin - ing 
0-. 



ill 





r T^-T i 

1 1 &—W — — i 1 




branch - es, 


1 « 1 & — J 

A par - a - 




- dise we 


a&fi-^ __ 








=3= 


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- H 1 H 


P-s - 

: t— - 


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4= : 



















4-* ^ 


-=i — =i 

.. H - 












~m — g — #— 
a — 



find, 



Here we 



for - - ev - 



ban - ish The 



AWAY O'ER BRIGHT SUNNY MEADOWS. 



25 



— r*-i 1 — 



_3S| 5 

1 



that 



I 

cloud 



the mind. 



, Ali over us is the azure 

Of heaven extended wide* 
And under us by the streamlet 

The flowers bed, side by side; 
We love their timid glances, 

We love their colors bright, 
We love to see them bowing, 

And shrink in 2 from the light. 



SENTENCE. 



E3b?ztd 



ip—frrjf. 



He that would thrive .... Must rise by five 



-G- -G- 

Ke that would thrive 



Must rise by five. 



m 



i 



-z- 



He that has thriv'n May lie 



'till seven. 



:::ez:«: 



He that has thriv'n, May lie 



; till seven- 



26 



SUMMER SONG. 



Andante 




— b— 8-~ ®-0-e- 



1 y^hmmd ^- TI 7-^-^ V 1 yry 

— — ^ I I I i i " I 



All \'our scenes so 



bril - liant, 



They are dear to roe.' 



-m — \ 



i 



All the day I'm lively, 
Though the day is long; 
And from morn to evening, 
Sounds my happy song. 

3 

Let my mind be ever 
Bright as yonder sun; 
Pure as are the breezes, 
Just as night comes on. 



Meadows, fields and mountains, 
Clothed in shining green; 
Little rippling fountains, 
Through the willows seen, 



Birds that sweetly warble 
All the summer days, 
All things speak in music 
Your Creator's praise. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 




The bell that's in the stee - pie high. Is ring" - ing mer 



THE FADING LEAF. 

Andante, chorus ^ Duet. 

3 



27 



PfPfppiSfflsp 





m ^ 


— 1 — (_ 








h-T 



































found 



fade with those a - round 



me, All murmuring- life is 

:qz:£ 



wtjt: 



V, 



SEE 



brieT 



3 



I 



I saw the sky so blue, 
The birds were singing o'er me, 
The flowers sprung up before me, 

Of every changing hue. 



3 

The pleasant breeze was here, 
It whispered every hour, 
And held me in its power, 

Light tossing in the air. 



We fade as all else must; 
No more the birds are calling, 
The flowers and leaves are falling; 

Tomorrow we are dust. 



FRIENDSHIP. 

r\ M> i . i . . ! fc» _i i i i .i 








— h- , -t— 


4-3-- 


y — ri 


-u- P » * - 


m~j 

.At _| «L. 


1. A - 


r 

wake, a - wake the 


L( 1 ^.J 

tune - ful voice, And 


Vf ^ ^ 

1 1 -f- 

strike the joy - ful 








J- il 


— 






■ ' i 






=a£ i : 





— i 1- 



-0—q 



z:®z:S: 



— h 



-tl— U 



SZ3E 



— i 1 1- 



strings j We'll pour the mel- low notes a - long, And raise a peal-ing, 



33: 



-r 1 * : r * 



i 



glad - - ; ning song, 'Till heav'nwith mu - sic 



rings. 



'Tis not the cold and formal drawl, 

That wakes the inward flame, 
But ; tis the song that glows like fire, 
The song that feeling hearts inspire, 
A music worth the name. 



FRIENDSHIP. 



28 



3 

But hark! those sweet concordant notes 

That breathed a magic spell, 
That seem like sounds which angels sing, 
Like sounds which have in heaven their spring, 

Where holy beings dwell. 

4 

'Tis these that glow from friendship's soul, 

'Tis these that speak the heart: 
'Tis these that show the peaceful mind, 
The spirit meek, and pure, and kind, 

Unstained by vicious art. 

5 

O yes, 'tis here that music dwells, 

In friendship's sweet abode; 
'Tis here that notes concordant sound, 
'Tis here that harmony is found 

Like that which dwells with God. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 













m — 4— 


—9 









Scot-land's burn- \ng, Scot-land's burn- ing, Look out, look out, 



-O O- 



-O B- 



I i 4 



t 



-4- 

Fire I Fire ! Fire : Fire ! Pour on wa - ter, Pour on wa - ter. 







MAY SONG. 




m 



Tt 



2 C He com - eth, he com - eth, the glo - ri - ous May ! ? 

\ The sky is so clear, and the earth is so gay ; £ c 



f 



- J J rp n [ [ 



3f3: 



flow - ers smeil sweet - ly, 



all 



1 r 

blink - mg with dew, The 



HI 



T 



stream 



^3 



lets 



flow 



free - ly, 



the 



grass grows a - 



i 



— 



The nightingale flutes all night long in the wood, 
And songs of all birds tell us God is most good; 
The fishes glide under the water's blue dome, 
The bees round the sweet blossoms busily hum. 
3 

O welcome, O welcome, thou bringer of mirth! 
Our songs shall break forth, like the streams from the earth: 
Away, then, O sorrow, and dulness, depart! 
We'll meet the good May with a merry light heart. 



GOD IS LOVE. 



Andante* 



31 




1. /.o ! the heave 



e heavens are break - ing, 



Pure and bright a 




Mur - mur " God 



love,' 

z=\z 



'God 



love." 



5 



2. Round yon pine clad mountain, 4. Music now is ringing, 



Flows a golden flood: 
Hear the sparkling fountain, 
Whisper " God is good." 
3. See the streamlet bounding, 
Through the vale and wood. 
Hear its ripples sounding, 
Murmur " God is good." 



Through the shady grove, 
Feathered songsters singing, 
Warble " God is love." 

, Wake my heart, and springing 

Spread thy wings above, 
Soaring still and singing, 
God is ever good. 

God is good. 



32 



SPRING SONG. 



J, ANDRE. 



Allegretto. ^ 




J* B B ' ' ^ t** ^ i 

1. The heav-ens are smil-ing so soft and so blue. The hills 



±8: 



n 

1 — U4S — 



1 



-£>-&- 



-0-0- 



g£ gft j^a. 



^ * * f i i i Ui-r r r r 



meadows all 



e f f 

flit - ter with dew, The trees wave their blos-soms, so 




We'll off to the woods, and leave sorrow at home! 
We'll climb the green hills! 'tis pleasure to roam. 
Oh! who in the city would stay the year round, 
When pleasures like these are so easily found. 
3 

But ah! the sweet flowers, but bloom for a day! 
See, many have fallen, and sprinkle our way: 
They fall in light showers, if branches but wave, 
And strew the lone violet' balmiest grave. 



SPRING SONG. 



33 



So all things must feel the cold finger of death! 

The strongest must fall, and must yield up their breath, 

The fate of the monarch is seen in the rose, 

And ours in the slenderest blossom that grows. 



But death has no terrors to those who do right, 
To them he appears like an angel of light, 
And smilingly beckons their spirits away 
To realms of unending, unspeakable day. 



LESSON I. 
±31 



33f 



£=±±=t=±:=£r 




LESSON IV. 




1 3 a 



34 



S 



PLEASURES OF CHILDHOOD. 



Allegro. 



^--g-+-5 — t — 



zsiri ' 



H- — — j^ — — j N — jV 

— art 11 



****** 



{ Come, let us sine - - ing, Speak out those plea-sures Which crown our 
{ We prize them high - ly A - bove all trea-sures : How bright our 



g_s 4 _zj_^ 




^ i J- i us? i urf r » 



childhood, Those days so dear : 
sunshine ! How sweet, how clear ! 



r4- 



-ti — ^vg-^-lH- 

— ~i — esrsestrsxm — " 



Our days are May-days. Without a 



cloud, 



Then let us 



sing-ing Re- joice a - - loud. 




Our child-hood's 



H — r 



IN N 



pleasures Are like the rivers Whose onward flow-ing Is deep and free. 



H- 



PLEASURES OF CHILDHOOD. 



35 



Oh, how we're favor 'd, 
To live so cheerful, 
So free from sorrow, 
And free from care: 
While many 'round us 
Are sad and tearful: 
For, sad misfortune 
Does not them spare: 
Then we'il be happy 
While yet we can. 
While days of childhood 
Shall yet remain. 

Our childhood's, &.c, 



Yes, we will ever, 
By night and daily, 
Sing forth our pleasures 
In full good cheer; 
We're yet in childhood, 
And all goes gaily; 
Our age of sadness 
Is not yet near: 
Then let our voices 
Resound aloud; 
For all is sunshine, 
There's not a cloud. 

Our childhood's, &,c. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES 



When a wea-ry task you find it, Per - sc - verc and nev - er mind it, 




Nev - er mind it, 



Nev - er mind it. 



ROUND FOR TWO VOICES. 




The noblest he- ro of the whole, Is he who can himself con - trol 



HOME. MUSIC BY C. E, PAX. 

Andante Sostcnuto* 





I F*— 1 


sq- 




1. Home, home, can ? for - 


get thee ? 

"•-I — Z 


1 

Dear, 


i ' 
****** 

dear, dear-ly lov ; d 

4,1 r : 












roam. Home, home, dear - est and hap - pi - est home. 





■ i 




-1 f*i 


-O. — ■ 1 




~"-b-4- 4-- 


fa— 

-& H 























Home, home, why did I leave thee? 

Dear, dear friends do not mourn: 
Home, home, once more receive me, 

Quickly to thee I'll return. 
Home, home, 
Dearest and happiest home. 



Andante. 



AWAY TO THE GARDEN. 

^- t- IN- p* T- 



3? 



t 



\*1 



1. A 



way 



to 



t 

the 



I 



-9- 

Z - 

gar - den, Gay 



gar- lands 




we'll 



-t- 



m ^. 

^ 1 H™^ 1 a^— -ai r —29 ^ r*- 

— p ^ ^ ^ ^_L_^ 



twine ; We'll 



sing and be mer - ry, We'll sing and be 

& &- T -0 



I 



4= 



1 



U ^ ^ j L-.^ ^ L-^ L 1 



mer - ry, Till sink - ing 



heav- en The 



even-ing slars shine. 



in* 



2. Life's smiling around us 

With roseate hue ; 
With trouble and sorrow, :j 
With days that go heavy, 

We've little to do. 

3. Our voices unite in 

The chorus we sing. 
We're joyful and happy, :|| 
In summer and autumn, 

In winter and spring. 



4. With generous hope, we 

Look forward on life; 
No darkness hangs over :j| 
The sky of our heaven; 

No envy, nor strife. 

5. Then join us, companions, 

Gay garlands we'll twine, 
We'll sing and be merry :|| 
Till sinking in heaven 

The evening stars shine. 



38 



Moderate. 

H- 



WELCOME TO SCHOOL. Popular Melody. 



4 



5? P * & * & 



-w 1 

I p I 

1. Come, where joy and glad- ness Make each youth-fu] stranger 



i 



I I i 

wel - come guest j Come, where grief and sadness Will not find a dwell-ing 




1 



7T ? 



"4T 

I 



-0- 



your breast. 



I 



Time with us will pass a - way, With 



1 



~*~j"i~j"g~*~^~ r "!~T~i — ' — i — t ~ i — — it 



books, or work, or 



I I I 

health - ful play ; 



Some-times with a 



I 



WELCOME TO SCHOOL 



39 



:#=U=zj: 



3=5 



cheer - ful song-. The hap - py hours will glide a - long". 



* — 

D. C. 



& 1 



— F 
rat 



at 



Thus, our days employing, 
We are always learning some useful thing; 

These pursuits enjoying, 
Merrily together we will sing. 
Tho' in sports we take delight, 
"We also love to read and write; 
Those who teach us, too, we prize, 
Who strive to make us good and wise. 
Come where joy and gladness, &c. 



SENTENCE. 



1 



=jz 



at 



1— F 



Hast thou a sor - row That weighs on thy heart \ 



3F- n - * ' 


— 












1— *=S=t= 






- * 




— G 





Sing a sweet song, And how al - tered thou art. 



40 



CONTENTMENT. 



Allegro* 

v C £ £ Cf S J f c * ; s 



1. I 



am con - tent - ed, 
-ft- ft ft 



be 



. , ^ n if ^ ^ 

it known, By this, my nier - ry 



{zjzzzjzzjzzz^zz^zzzpzpii 

± 1 at & — L 



^ — — U — | — — L. j u> — Lj3 u* — L_^s ^ 



T 

strain j And many a man who wears a crown, Has tried to be in 




^ ^ ^ i< E* p k ^ r ^ 

in 5 Or should he chance to love his lot, Pray what has Tie that 



3=t 



::afc 



i 



i 



I have not. 



The sultan and the grand mogul, 
And, what's his name?* who soon, 

Though lord of earth, grew very dull 
And wistful eyed the moon; 

I envy not such men as these, 

But laugh at them with perfect ease. 



Alexander the Great. 



CONTENTMENT. 



41 



3 

For pleasure, fame, and riches too, 

Are but as brittle glass; 
Things in mysterious order move, 

And oft it comes to pass, 
The poor man's mite becomes a pound, 
The rich man finds he has a bound. 

4 

With manly purpose do what's right, 

Nor care for fame or gold; 
So shalt thou find thy spirits light, 

And fresh when thou art old: 
With glowing heart, and conscience clear, 
There's not a thing on earth to fear. 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 



To spend the day well think - ing nought of the mor - row. 



— 12 49 m m- 



-0- 



mm 



To help a poor neigh - bor in want, or in sor - row, 



m 



Gives peace, gives rest, makes hap - py, makes blest. 



SPRING-WISHES. 



Allesrro. 




CHORUS. 



1. Come a - - gain ! come a - gain ! come 

2. Come a - - gain ! come a - ^ain ! come 



t r 

a - - gain ! 
a - - gain ! 



-i — 




l-T 1- 



Sweet spring weather, 
Sweet spring weather, 



Haste thee hith-erj 
Kaste thee hith - er ; 



Spring, come reign 1 
Spring, come reign ! 



f | BET- 

j — BHD' BS3J3B 



imad 



— 



m 



Spring, come reign ! Come a - gain ! come 
Spring", come rei^n ! Come a - gain ! come 



t 



T 

gam '. come a - gain ! 
gain ! come a - gain ! 



01 



-Rn 



±=±i 



Soli. I 

O come ! bring the blossoms back a-gain ! The mod-est lit -tie snow-drop Al- 
O come ! bring the swallows back a-gain ! They come & build their nests now Just 



=f 



1 



1 



is — $- 



SPRING-WISHES. 

V 1 (V 



43 



- - rea - dy is in sight, And eve - ry day we watch it With 
where they did of old, While we with joy and won -der The 



=1- 




won - cler and de - light, \t^e 
bu - sy scene be - hold, And 



on - cfer where, since au - tumn, Its 
cu * ri - ous ; keep ask- ing, " Where 




t. 

have 



tie 
the 



life it kept 5 And it all through the win - ter, Be - 
swal-lows been, Since hill - side, field and for - est, In 



natzafc 



Pia. 



neath 



the 
tumn 



snow it slept, 
lost their green." 



— i- 



Z? % 1 

Come a - - gain! ^ r> 
Come a - - gain ! ' ' 



-PS P?- 



44 



Afifetiuoso. 



THE BEAUTIFUL FLOWER. 



tan 



* i 

I. 1 know of 



flow - er, most fair 



to be 



hold j ; Tis 



— i-p-i 




me than are 



f-f' -l — * — g—p 
5 — £-±:J 1 



ver and gold; For 



■4- 




worn 



the true feel-ing breast, It 



on the 



=t5=fc=±:t=tfcd 




cau - - ses the 



P 



ev'n on earth 



to be blest. 



THE BEAUTIFUL FLOWER. 



45 



In life's stormy troubles, the heart it keeps up, 
And tempers the gall of adversity's cup; 
And though we be humbled, and stripped of our all, 
This beautiful flower, from our breast will not fall. 

3 

It shareth our lot in whatever abode, 
It blooms on our smooth, and our difficult road; 
And though even hope fail, our last only stay, 
This flower still blossoms, and knows no decay. 

4 

Oh! bless 'd be the hour in which it was found, 
The sweet flower of FRIENDSHIP ! and may it abound; 
And bless 'd be the hand, which nrst gave it to me, 
Thro' life my companion it ever shall be. 



4 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 



— 



±±=t 



10. 



±t=fc 



_0 — e — IE 



The bell doth toll. Its e - choes roll, I know the sound full 







—zt n — i- 








— -* -* - 


- -J. -J — *— p~ ; 




—0 







well. 



I hear it ring, It calls to sing, With its 



dt 



m 



:*zz*: 



bim, bim, bim, borne, bell, 



Borne, borne, bim, borne, bell. 



TO THE GOOD CAUSE. 



Hold, 

& «xz 



Polish National Air. 



To the good cause ; To t!f!e cause for which we'll ev - er strive so 



$ k* 



1 



P- 



#- 

- i — r 



I 



-«.•-, 



* g r ^ ' ' " ^ * * +> g 

man - ful - \y ; To the good cause ; May it pros - per more and 



ad 



1 |— i k£- 



i— 




^r^-yF-d "^JF* ifr 1 



p p p 

more, and speed con - tin - uSl - ly 



UK 

The brave few, the 
r-^ — r ^ & r 



P. 



T» a- 



=t=fc 



i 



:|.--:f.-f-:|-jj;:|:-. 
p p P 



p £ ' pppppp 

good and true, Who've struggled for it so sue - cess-ful -ly ; Oh i 



0—0-^—0- 



H — F 



\\- r 0~0 ^-0—\- 

W K 1 H- 

k*-|— k* 



TO THE GOOD CAUSE. 

/ 

— I — | — j-^- — — | — * — I** - • 



47 



may their triumph now he speech - ly, To them of right be vie - to - ry. 



G & & 

r r 



+ 27£Z£ , 



t= 



zrz^ 



ROUND FOR EIGHT VOICES. 













i 






?§ 3 — 




1 ^ 




!— J 1 




j. _ 


f H h i 




H * ^ 1 


L « # 9 




f ^ H 



Now let notes of joy as - cend - ing, And har - mo - nious 



voi - ces bleiid-ing, Giad-den eve - ry heart, Glad - den eve • ry 



heart j Fr 



-0—0- 



t=± 



Friends with you we'll share the plea-sure, If you know the 



M — --d-A-l 




=t=t 










i_Z|ZZjZ. tf 






|Z| — 


— i — 
— i — 




K 








-0 — 
-a 


_ 





air and measure, Come and take a part, 



Come and take a part. 



48 'TIS NEAR THE SPOT IN WHICH I DWELL. 

Andante. 




& — m — 0- 



i 



2 ( "^is near tne s P ot 111 which I dwell, There stands a love - ly 
En - com-pass'd by a charm-frig dell, In which I love to 

T ~ 



±±2 



-e- 



: b j^=;=#=p4j--g-:|z=|=:i^i^lEti4 

F- a ^ ] I 1 p_I-Jf j j- 




I I 

grove, / 
rove, ) 



To 



7—tr 

seek the gen - tie breez- es 7 sigh, And 



-0- 



Mb 



:*=]: 



— 



Hr 



4- 



3= 



-i — h 



hear the fea-ther'd 



song-ster's cry cuck - oo, cuck - oo, cuck ■ 



1 



To seek the gen - tie breez - es' sigh, And 



iEfc 



oo, cuck- oo, To seek the gen 



'TIS NEAR THE SPOT IN WHICH I DWELL. 



49 



hear the feather'd songster's cry, Cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, cuckoo, cuck- oo. 



— b-3b 



E 



pi 



If days of sadness e'er assail, 

I hie me to the wood, 
Where streams of pleasure never fail, 

Where all is bright and good: 
'Tis here, when no one else is nigh, 
I hear the cuckoo's cheerful cry. 
Cuckoo, &.c. 

3 

When days of joy come o'er my head, 
I seek this charming scene, 

Alone along the valley tread, 
And view the lively green: 

And who so happy then as I, 

In hearing oft the cheerful cry, 
Cuckoo, Ike. 



m 



SENTENCE. 

— h- 



-Aff~things round us and a - bove, Siil! pro- claim 



that 



God is love 



50 THE SUN AND THE BROOK. 

Allegretto. 



J 




J: 



j ( To mea - dow brook, The Sun he spoke, 
* £ What but the light, Makes them so bright, 



And said, " I sure - ly 
The light from me they 




blame you ! Thro' eve - - - ry place The 
bor- row 1 Yet me you slight To 



flowers you cnase, As 
get a sight At 



P f 



3* 



r r r 



if there's nought could shame you. > . , , 
thern — and I must sor - row ! S 



*- f» j"* ^ 



^ — IB — ^j_J — ^ ^j. 



pi - - ty take, On 
# 





^ — — . — p> — 


V ~— ~ 








r-f 1 - s • J 

-art -f- 

w y U U 

me, and make, Your 


smooth breast still - - er, 


clear - er; And 


{■ p» P .... * 
— , — . — 1 — c! — e — i 


— a 


— fi—t ■■ 




The brook flowed on. 

And said anon: 
4 £ Good Sun, it should not grieve you 

That as I run, 

I gaze upon, 
The motley iiowers, and leave you. 

You are so great 

In heavenly state, 
And they so unpretending; 

On you they wait 

And only get 
The graces of your lending. 

But when the sea 

Receiveth me, 
From them I must me sever; 

I then shall be 

A glass to thee 
Reflecting thee forever. " 



SENTENCE. 




God commands, and I must do. He will guide me safe-ly through. 



THE SINGER'S SONG. 




% f When the heavy hours drag, 

Heavier hours bringing, 
When our spirits faint and flag, 

Then we fly to singing. 
Cheerily the while we sing, 

Flies the brightened hour, 
Dullness lifts her drooping wing, 

Charmed by music's power. 

3. When by vile vexations crossed, 

And in nought take pleasure, 
When our comfort we have lost, 

Try a sprightly measure. 
This shall charm back all our powers, 

While we fondly hear it; 
What the dew is to the flowers, 

Songs are to the spirit. 



THE SINGER S SONG. 
4. Mountain, valley, field and grove, 
With sweet songs are ringing ; 

O DO 7 

We like birds will evermore, 
Cheer the hours with singing. 

Say what helps us all along, 
On the way before us, 

Like a true and tender song, 
Or a noble chorus. 



53 



3E 



LESSON V. 



:b: 



— — , 








1 m 

1 Q 








I 1 J 





LESSON VI. 



LESSON VII. 







'■ £ 1 








=t=E 


- — © 




: t i 


— &— 


mm 







I' 



LESSON VIII. 



sib: 



:2: 



— 1 — |- =j=tr 
-ti—et-o-iir 



54 



WE KNOW A LAND. 



NAGELI. 



Moderate. 



| 4 ^ 






.— * — • 


— * 

— i — 


0- *— 

f U" 




: 








—c 








Hi 







1. We know a land of beau - ty's train, A - donvd with streams and 



^=P:::^z. 




WE KNOW A LAND. 



56 



We know a land of virtue's growth, 
A land that no deception knows, 
A happy land, where love and truth 
Allay the pain of earthly woes. 
This worthy land we well may own, 
It is a land we call our own. 

3 

We know a land where moral light 
Has shed its hallow'd influence round: 
Whose people know the God of might, 
And love the gospel's gladd'ning sound. 
This sacred land so lovely shown, 
We surely may be proud to own. 

4 

We hail thee, land so pure and great; 

With welcome honors thee we greet: 

Oh! may we every evil hate, 

That God may here maintain his seat. 

So shall we ever love to own, 

That this great nation is our own. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 



SHE 



& * g 



i 



~w w 



Let us en - dea - vor To show that when - ev - er We 



--#-*- 



m 



i 



-0 — 0- 

join in a song-, We keep time to - - geth - er. 



56 




VACATION SONG 
— [v- 



— r ar - 



v «=-#- 



1. A - way o - ver mountain, a - way o-ver plain ! Va -ca-tion has come with its 



as 





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m 














" ^ • '0 J «' 1 


— • 










•* 

i 




"a 




1 bd 



pleasures a - gain ; Where young steps are bounding, And young hearts are 



m 

— ■— i 



:ez: 



3= 



zfc=t=tz=fc 



S 



-ff iV 



£1 



i 



— 5 • y 

gay, To the fun and 



i 

the 



I 

frol 



• way, boys, a - 



way. 
ft 



HE 




^ I I 

A - - way ! A - 



0-0-0- 

1-rrf 



I I ^ I ^ 

way ! To the fun and the frol- ic, a - way, boys a - - 



1r 



I i 



VACATION SONG. 57 

- - way ! To the fun and the frol- ic, a - way boys, a - - way ! 

—— E=±zizi:*z^z:•zi:fz£zz^z^rz:tI-^=i£=F- |: ■; 

2. We've sought your approval with hearty good will. 
We "old ones," have spoken, we young ones sat still; 
But now 'tis all over, we're off to our play, 

Nor will think of a school-book for three weeks to-day. 
Away, away! 

Nor will think of a school-book for three weeks to-day. 

3. The fresh breezes revel the branches between; 
The bird springs aloft, from her covert of green; 
Our dog waits our whistle, the fleet steed our call, 
Our boat safely rocks where we moored her last fall, 

Our boat, our boat! 
Our boat safely rocks where we moored her last fall. 

4. Where the clustering grapes hang purple, we know, 
The pastures and woods where the ripe berries grow, 
The broad trees we'll climb where the sunny fruits rest, 
And bring down their stores for the lips we love best. 

Love best, love best! 
And bring down their stores for the lips we love best. 

5. Dear comrades, farewell! ye, who join us no more, 
Think life is a school, and till term-time is o'er, 
Oh! meet unrepining each task that is given, 

Till our time of probation is ended in heaven, 

In heaven, in heaven! 
Till our time of probation is ended in heaven. 



THE MIGHT WITH THE RIGHT, dr. callcoti 




r T . t r f r f ' 1 r 

1. May ev - ery year but draw more near The time when strife 



shal 
IPC 



-0 



4- 



± 



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m 



it 



cease, And truth and love all hearts shall move, To live in joy 



and 




I 1 1 I I ■ ! I 

peace. Now sor -row reigns, and earth complains, 



SEE 



S3 



33 



J |_. 



-O — & — 0—©- 



I ^ 



power main-tains ; But the day shall yet ap ■ 



pear, 





When 



EE 



the 



±z=t: 



THE MIGHT WITH THE RIGHT. 



59 



the 



With the 



might with the right, and the truth shall 



be, When the 



right, 



/ 



TT (" 



might with the right, and the truth shall be, And come what there may, To 



-0—0—0- 



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qa — ^ — * — # — *-\-<2r£ — f~® 
- 5 — * — # — i — — #-p — *~~S 



_i h 

— 



i 



stand in the wav, That 

zi p— 9—?—?— *-: 



day 



the 



i 

world shall see. 



SEE 



Let good men ne'er of truth despair, 
Though humble efforts fail; 

Oh! give not o'er, until once more 
The righteous cause prevail. 

In vain, and long, enduring wrong, 

The weak may strive against the strong: 
But the day shall yet appear, 

When the might, &c. 



3 

Though interest pleads that noble deeds 

The world will not regard; 
To noble minds, that duty binds, 

No sacrifice is hard. 
The brave and true may seem but few, 
But hope has better things in view; 

And the day will yet appear, 
When the might, &c. 



"Rich, after dull and shade-brooding night." 

An dan t in o. 



1. Rich, af - ter dull and shade-brooding 1 night, Rich ri - ses morn-ing's 



-0- keai 



beau - te - ous light. 



p £ b 

As the morn -ing's flush to 



na - ture, Man, to 



thee is hea 



j-l ^< 

b u 

leaven-ly 



el 



1 L» - 

y grace O be 



thou, then, to 



Tin- 



As the 



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i 



morn - ing's flush to na-ture, As the morn - ing's flush to na - ture. 



~ £>' 



ft 



"Rich, after dull and shade-brooding night." (J I 

O 

Softly distil the dew-drops of dawn, 

O'er herb and flower, and garden and lawn. 

As the dew-drops to the flower, 

Man, to thee is heavenly grace; 

O be thou, then, to thy race 

As the dew-drops to the flower. 
3 

Kindly the bower with shades overspread, 
Shield from hot noon the languishing head. 

Like a bowery shade in summer, 

Man, to thee is heavenly grace; 

O be thou, then, to thy race, 

Like a bowery shade in summer. 
4 

Bearer of plenty, pure from the mount, 
Pours o'er the fields the bright-gushing fount. 

As a fount to sun-parched pastures, 

Man, to thee is heavenly grace; 

O be thou, then, to thy race, 

As a fount to sun-parched pastures. 
5 

Pure from the storm's dread cloud-tents unfurled, 
Streams forth the bow of peace o'er the world: 

Like the rain-bow after tempest, 

Man, to thee is heavenly grace; 

O be thou, then, to thy race, 

Like the rain-bow after tempest. 



SENTENCE. 

Beau - ty blooms the long - est there, Where the mind it - self is fair. 



SONG OF THE FREE. 



Allegro. 




. i , ,, pi I i , i i i r. n 



1. We're glad for the bless- ing We're rich-ly pos - sess -ing, To 



4 0- 



I I I 



— !-— ^ 



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4? -+■ 

H 



I 



I 



live as the free: 



Oh! where is 



the 



na - tion In 



i-p—jtz 



all the ere 



tion 



So 



i 



hap - py as we. 



I 



r * i i - 



+ 



We'll sing of our glory, 
And tell the glad story, 

Through earth's wide domain; 
That here is no cow'ring, 
To haughty o'erpow'ring: 

No sov'reign to reign. 



SONG OF THE FREE. 



63 



3 

We'll speak of the treasure, 
Possessed in full measure, 

To rule as we choose: 
All sovereign dictation, 
In this happy nation, 

We'll ever refuse 

4 

Our lands and our waters, 
Our sons and our daughters, 

Shall ever be free: 
We'll shout for the glory, 
We'll tell the glad story, 

In loud merry glee. 

5 

Let tyrants and slavery, 
And vices and knavery, 

Be put far away: 
Then all that we cherish, 
Shall fadelessly flourish. 

Nor ever decay. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 
Morn-ing is break - ing, Songsters are wak - ing: 



P 



All things are cheer • ly, When 'tis so ear - \y. 



PATRIOTIC SONG. 



Maestoso. 



Scotch Air. 



1. Friends, we 



bid 



'.a 



> ^ u U 

you wel- come here, Free-dom's sa- cred cause reven 



7^ 




U 5 , v 5 



^ jv fe. V ^ T — ^ N- N- 



& & + * 



Dai - ly breathe a prayer sin - cere, For them who suf 



fer wrong 



3±fc 



1 




fr V fH- ^ ^-^~@t — ^ rV *»-^'-: 



& — ^ — b^- 



. to*, jS U~ ^ ^ 

Fear not, lest your hope should fail, Truth is strong and must pre- vail 



t — | — 



— tr - #v — — ^ — 15* — > ^ N p*-- 



f — 



V W & % . 

What tho ? foes our cause as - sail, They'll nev - er pros- per long. 



!> 



PATRIOTIC SONG. 



86 



Who is he devoid of shame, 

Justice for himself would claim, 
Yet deny to all the same, 

Through vain and selfish pride? 
Friends, you long our hearts have known, 

You're not left to fight alone; 
We will make the cause our own, 
For Heaven is on our side. 
S 

Who would live, to live in vain, 

Live alone for worldly gain? 
Spending days and nights in pain 
For some ignoble end. 
We would hope to leave behind, 
Better times than now we find; 
Better be it for mankind, 

That we have lived their friend. 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 




- gain the sum-mer's near 



Its 



gen 



tie bree^ - cs 



I 



~l 



3= 



m 



-p 



sigh ) The fea-ther ? d war- biers cheer us ; The cuck-oos sweet - I y 



en 



c *y> 



H-^-f- 



Cuckoo, 



Cuckoo, 



Cuckoo 



66 



THE FOUNT OF JOY. 



Cheerfully* 
Wt>— ^f- • 9 9 9- 



! 9 H 



I 



i J J°y? y es j°y' s tfte quick'ning stream, Which the 
£ Gladdening with its crys - tal gleam, All her 



Which the whole earth 
sons and 



i 



^ 1 — 8 — i 1 1 f— — 1 — t F- 



wa - - ters, > 
daugh - ters. ) 



— i — 



What in val - ley 



blow eth, 



— b~ 



A 



1 



-0- 



-I 



-ft — h i 1 1 1 — i — H >— H t #1^3-3^3-- 



What the hill - side show - - eth, 



Full of 





1 





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« - 


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sft — — g g- 



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There are stores of 



I 

joy 



i 

to bless i 



THE FOUNT OF JOY. 07 



±rh — J— 


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— * 


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1 i ^ ^ 






a — 




y 









And our dan - - gcr is ex - - cess — And our 




O 

Every one, in his own way, 

Eagerly pursues it; 
But to seek, is oft the way 
Certainly to lose it. 

Happy he who knoweth, 
Where the true joy groweth, 
And the false foregoeth! 
Yes! we've stores of joy to bless, 
And our danger is excess! 



SENTENCE. 

w * & & r i i i r -p- -p- 

Art thou dis - ap- point-ed ? Mur-mur not, But with pa-tience bear thy lot. 



63 



THE PILOT. 



Andantino. 




it 



— 1_ 



|MBB_ 



- — pv- 



W& 1 



deep ; 



-0- 



I'll come and pace 



-F- 



B?sca 

the 



I 



deck with thee, I 



2? l - <S3- — * 




do not dare to sleep : 



u Go down/ 7 the 



sai - - lor 



at 



_ ^ ; — a?— — ^ 

-j. ^ — i — | — | — j^j — ^ — i~*^r' 



EES 



3& 



T^t r 

cried, u go down, This 



r 



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15^ 



I^ZZfE 



no place 



octal 

for thee, 



m 



Fear 



jfc=Jt 



HIM 



THE PILOT. 



69 



not, but trust in Prov - i -dence, Where ev - er thou may'st be." 

r : r jp B • § j |r 

— #- — ± -&~—0 — Q — ®- x i-Q- — 



— 1 




1 - 




-e±. — o 




1 — 


L_^_L_0 # * — 



o 

Ah! Pilot, dangers often met, 

We all are apt to slight; 
And thou hast known these raging waves, 

But to subdue their might. 
"Oh! 'tis not apathy," he cried, 

1 'That gives this strength to me: 
Fear not, but trust in Providence, 

Wherever thou may'st be." 

3 

f< On such a night the sea engulphed, 

My father's lifeless form; 
My only brother's boat went dow r n, 

In just so wild a storm; T 
And such, perhaps, may be my fate, 

But still I say to thee, 
Fear not, but trust in Providence, 

Wherever thou may'st be." 



ROUND FOR TWO OR FOUR VOICES 

-& — & — 



USUI 



Love your neighbor, Live by la - bor ; Would you pros - per, That's the way. 



THE WAY TO CONTENTMENT. bischoff. 



Allegro. Thoo Voices. 

zf:2E3zz3= 



J0Z 



1. Let us with a cheer- ful mind. Lead our life up 



-right- ly; 





mad ^ & & & & \ J I k £ P 



Vir-tue's paths e'er tak - ing, All that's ill for * 



t: 



CHORUS. 

:zT3zz:tzf::zrfz 



sak - ing. 



Come 



let us all 



- nite in this. And 



zfczzzz£zz£:zz|zz:z£ 



z,zzz£pz£z:£zz£z£] 



so con- tent- ment we'll pos -sess, And then we'll all be 



THE WAY TO CONTENTMENT. 71 









W- t— fe- " 1=3=8 : 

glad, glad, glad, And 


U U ,* ff 

then we'll all be 


1 

glad, 


_r_«_. \ 


a — 0—0 — 0— 




. ^ 1 — p_£ f |=— 


I F T" 





o 

Let. us banish lust and pride> 
Living pure and humble; 
Given to ail well-doing, 
Every vice eschewing: 
Chorus:— Come let us all, &c. 

3 

Let us ever cherish truth. 
Truth is worth possessing; 
Let us live uprightly, 
Hourly, daily, nightly. 
Chorus: — Come let us all, &c. 

4 

Let us seek in all we do, 
Solid, lasting treasure; 
Good we e'er may cherish, 
Good that will not perish. 
Chorus: — Come let us all, Sic. 

Note. — At the words glad, glad> glad, the hands are to be clapped. 



ROUND FOR TWO VOICES. 

Time and tide will wait for no man. 




72 



ADIEU. 



Leaving School. 




r/ JP h 



4 — ^- 



1st Voice. So go - est thou for - ev - er forth, A - dieu, A-dieu, A 
2d Voice. I go from thee for - ev - er forth, A - dieu, A-dieu, A 

±zz\- A 



■ 4 i d i 



I 



Sprats 



- - dieu. 

- - dieu. 



3 



w W * * \* W & 

For - get me not in thought of fame, But 



-f- 



— i — 



— r?— L — h: — ^ — 6* K — ■ — P H W f-- 



f*/ W w W & 

in thy heart be still the same, A 

f7s 



dieu, 



A - dieu, A 



-!** — U- 



-^)-t— 1 — — ^ — i***"t — i — -r~ 



p to* p w |# j 

dieu, A - dieu, A - dieu, A - dieu, A - dieu, A-dieu, A - dieu. 



ADIEU. 



73 



2 

1st. V. We'll sing the song before we part, Adieu, &c. 
2d. V. We'll sing the song before we part, Adieu, &c. 
Both. Where'er thou art, be heaven thy guide, 

And love inspire whate'er betide, Adieu, Stc. 

3 : ; v * ' f 

1st. V. The flowers are budding bright and fair, Adieu, &,c* 
2d. V. The flowers are budding bright and fair, Adieu, &c. 
Both. And nature wears her gayest smile, 

But clouds may lurk unseen the while. Adieu, &.c. 

4 

1st. V. The clouds may spread when thou art gone, Adieu, &c. 
2d. V. The clouds may spread when I am gone, Adieu, &c. 
Both. And when the world is cold and drear, 

We'll bless the link that bound us here, Adieu, &,c. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 



Sing me an - oth - er be- fore we de-part, Sing it in 



Er~ s . 








bet 


— 








f . =zt tzzt-: 




- 1 1 




rztJ 











praise of our mu - si - cal art. 



Sing 



-0 — 0- 



-0—*—^-*—*—*- 

Do do do, Sol soi sol, Sol sol sol, Do. 



74 THE SAIL 

Andantino. J 



Venetian Melody* 



W 4 1 . F :=z y 



£7~ 



I 

1. Our 



lit 



i 

boat 



4- 



beck'n - - ing 



5 » 

by the 



— 

* * ' U * "? 

u 5 ^ * * 

strand, by the strand, And strug- gles gent - ly 



5 j? 

loos - ened from its 



1 




a) / — *> -J* f^— JS S jM 



band. 



So 



we leave 



the 



& « ^ 1- 

W h- — — 0— 



— iH- — fc- — — — -- r 

— K— — i^- — N — Nfr — 1^- — ^ — ^ — pM - 



K w w 
* * * 



-0- B 



shore ! Gai - ly sing - ing, Light-ly spring-ing 



ks b .b b b b b b "B 

ly spring-mg, Gai - ly sing -ing, Light-ly 



-a 



THE SAIL. 



75 



k > I* £ / ^ ' 2 > ? 



-9 -9' J? ' ' J 

Springing, While our boatman plies the 



oar, plies the oar, oar. 



The joyous birds are warbling in the trees, 
While swiftly on we're bounding with the breeze, 
The waves before us run, 
Leaping, dancing, 
Foaming, glancing, 



Repeat. 



In the brightly setting sun 



The moon is softly stealing through the sky, 
And fills with gentlest feeling every eye. 
And many a brilliant star, 
Flashes o'er us, ) -p 

* ii (+ ( xvEPEAT. 

And before us, ) 
In the rolling wave afar. 



ROUND FOR FIVE VOICES. 



S--0- 



-0-0-0 



^-9-0-j 



If your ear is closed to song, Yourself, and all your friends you wrong*. 



Lively. 

V ZBE — -gj — i — i 



THE STARS, from c. m. von weber. 



— i ^— ^— J--1 

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



* & * & 



1. The stars are all cheerful- ly blink - ing, With friendli - est eyes through UV 



t3= 



i 




— p«- — r«- — — a — — ~ —r^i 



night j 



They seem to 



smil - ing and wink - ing, 



And 



33p 

-«> 



1 




us to their pleasures in - vite. 

=0 1— m 



— ^_J5j§ 

— **-K-|#-* 



The 
And 



earth and the heav-ens are 
o - ver their troop brightly 




THE STARS. 



77 



2 

Ye heavenly lights! O attend us, 
And light us along on our way; 

How bright are the smiles that ye lend us, 
Then list ye, O list to our lay. 
The earth and the heavens, SvC. 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 

n** -r IZj^ZlJ 



'ML 



ifizpz: 



How sweet to be roam-ing, When sum - mer is blooming, Thro' 

__ T _^_ __ — j f^~~f E j i Z f*--\ 




— Z" ~T 



wood-land and grove, Thro' wood-land and grove. How sweet to be 

ta h 



uj 1 • — 23 r 1 

roam-ing, When sum - mer is blooming, Thro 1 woodland and grove, Thr< 

®zz fzi— dz±.ez= , :l::«=t^zz'Z«r±:^zzz^=f:±r 



wood-Iand and grove. How sweet, how sweet, how sweet to be 



:#zz*_ 



£$4 



roaming, W r hen sum -mer is blooming, Thro 5 woodland and grove. 



ALWAYS SOME GOOD, music by nagelh 



Andantiiio 




-*> — — 



Eve - ry for - tune brings some lit - tie trea - 




1 — y M 1 — ^ 1 1— ^— 0-%0-%G-%-^r- 

H — k- — I — y-*a-«y-€ — I- — % — &—&\ — f-o-w — h- 



r 

Good that's mix d with some al - loy 



^ p ^ 



Yet a 



we may en - joy. 



-0 



— -H — ^ > ff — H i-r* 2 ^~ 3 r- 

f i r 

Good that's mix'd with some al - loy, Yet a go°j w e may en joy. 



ALWAYS SOME GOOD. 



79 



2 

Winter spreads its garb of snowy whiteness, 
Spring-time brings its days of sunny brightness ; 

Good that's mix'd with some alloy, 

Yet a good we may enjoy. 

3 

Summer's suns and Autumn's fruitful showers, 
Fill the fields with waving grain and flowers; 

Good that's not without alloy, 

Still a good we may enjoy. 

4 

Every season brings a sum of pleasure, 
Every fortune brings some little treasure ; 

Good that's mix'd with some alloy. 

Yet a good we may enjoy. 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 



W~4f- 



m 



3=3 



z£=f: 



a 



- 



The hour is come of twi - light gray, And even-ing veils the 
^ 1 a & 0— T —O a O 



± 



face of day, The shades of night be - gin to fall, 



k — 14- 

} *ziz 



I 1 I 



And dark-ness soon will cov - er all. 



80 



THE WAY-WORN TRAVELER. English Song. 



: 4 — gz=zf:f-gzz3zz r4jEz 



2 C Faint and wea - ri - ly the way- worn trav - el - 
I Wandering drea - ri - ly and sad un - rav - el - 



— g-^— g- 



I 



— I- 



-O- ~G- 

Oh ! how brisk - ly then the way- worn trav - el - - er 



1 



Plods un cheer - i - - ly 

Of the 



- - fraid to stop ; ) 
maz - es on the moun -tain top ; ) 



ZMZ 



Treads the 



maz - es on the moun -tain top. 



— — i — I &- 

tasai !■ — 



_j _ ,v ^- fa- >»- 

-M—d — ^ — € — 



-\essJ— 



Doubt - ing, fear - - ing ? While his course he's steer - ing, 

W^T~" T — 1 ~ ~~ T — ! T — h 



~M a- 



3t 
_2L 



id: 



-4L 



1 — * 5 

J 1 sq— ks*- 

b*» 1-^- 



— j—r — f*- r* 1^ 

■A 1 — £ — 1 



,V pV-i 1 m 

! ^ ^_J-_| 1 1 



Cot - ta - ges ap - pear - ing, As he's nigh to drop. D. C 



m^—^zi 
— ? — 



::_z:szzz 
zg-z 



3t 



-£7- 



THE WAY-WORN TRAVELER. 



81 



Though so sad and lone the day has past away, 

'Twould be folly now to think on't more; 
Happily he sits in twilight's softest ray, 
Ever welcome to the cotter's door. 

Doubting, fearing, 

While his course he's steering, 

Cottages appearing, 

As he's nigh to drop; 
Oh! how happy now the way-worn traveler, 
Rests securely on the mountain-top. 




S3 ALL HAIL TO OUR FAVORITE MAY. 

Lively. 



GROSHZIM. 




& i r r 
fa* k >* . 

wing 1 - ing. Are joy - ful - ly sing - nig, Their 
heath -er 7 Are skip- ping to - getii - er, And 



cho - rus so 
all in the 
-&~ 

-T---0 . _ 




1 J Jf.i. _^ JL_^_^_ X . 



1^ I 




loud seems to 




Come haste to en - joy the sweet 



-alt d<^4 
\ *\ t - — ! <~ 




ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 













. | , 


.,. r 








-°- 0:. 













Sweetly now at even -ing hour 



Bells are ring-ing, 



:p=p5==rg: 



1 



From the lof - ty old church tower, 
> > 



Hear them ding-ing, 
> > 



zgziz^zizztfc^ 

Bim, Borne, Call-ingal! from !a -bor ; Man and ehild, and neighbor, Bim, Borne. 



:: zSzf::2j| 



84 



THE FLOWERS OF THE LEA. h. s. van dyke. 



Allegretto. 



I. I am twin-ing, I am twin-ing, The flowers of the 



$4- 



9 



-& * 



I 1 Pi 




lea; They are pin - ing, They are pin - ing, For 



# — #- 



r* # — 



* ^- 1J!r= 5-- 



SI 



sweet - ness from thee. 



Oh! breathe o'er them 







light p ly, 'Twill make them more rare. 



Oh! 



=t=t 



-* 0- 



* The pause to be observed only at the close of the stanza. 



THE FLOWERS OF THE LEA. 85 

Ritard O 











^ , 1 * *~ 

gaze on them 


bright- ly, 'Twill 
-# • # 

"I 1 L_ : 


make them more 

:1 — h -f 


fair. D. C. 



2 

They were sleeping, :|| 

With dews on the plain; 
They are weeping, :|| 

For home, now, again. 
Then take them and cherish. 

The flowers of the lea; 
They never can perish, 

While treasured for thee. 
I am twining, &c. 



LESSON XI. 



£ A — L 1 










—14 X t=i 




h & P2 - 

— 1 ! \ 


P- &— 




_ J - & 


L_| J 





ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 









' A -1 =U 








» — 




* * 






©-4— 













Love of truth, Guide my youth, From my heart, Ne'er de-part. 



86 



OUR FATHER LAND. 



Allegro. 

r T z ^ r _ f .T^^ 



1. Come, one and all, around we stand ; Come join in swelling cho - rus ; And 
!*_| — J__$i -0 1 — J-_^ J-_U— { 1 [ — X4 [— ~l -t 




& 1 

praise our good-ly 



-+- 



T 



na- live land, Our fa-tber-land that bore 

zazz^zziezzzizzlzzlzzi: 



zr: 



E 



2. Old ocean bore from Mammon's marts, 

The plant of Freedom hither; 
It blossoms yet, and glads our hearts, 
And we'll not let it wither. 

3. Where now we stand, our sires once stood; 

Firm men were they, true-hearted; 
Say, lives there now a race as good, 
Or have they all departed? 

4. From zeal for freedom and for God, 

No charms of wealth could win them; 
O'er ocean tost, these wilds they trod; 
They carried home within them. 

5. They cared not to be here renowned, 

Cared not for fame or glory; 
But persecutions on them frowned, 
And made them great in story. 



THE SINGING MEETING. 



67 



And an tin o. 



-fi- — <3» 1 # 2 « g- 



u 

I. To 



Si 



our loved cir 



greet 



ing! Here 



— 87^ t 



-^- + -_ p: :»: 



fill and true 



; * *• -#-f * s s ; ;~* 




Yet, springeth the rose bush, Oh! never! 

Without the rude thorn on its bough. 
The summer breeze stays not forever, 

For soon will the winter wind blow. 

3 

But friendship shall drive away sadness, 
And love fill our bosoms with joy; 

While singing together in gladness, 
Our happiness none shall destroy. 



88 



THE LOVELY MAY IS COMING, paisiello. 



Andante. 

•He-*— 



*=at 



=« 



5^ 



1. The love 



May 



1 / 

com-ing, 



All decked in glittering 



-B p_ 

I s — ^ 



green, 



H — 



-I— ■ 



k* I & i ^ 

Ye flowers from grove and mea - dow, 




THE LOVELY MAY IS COMING. 



80 



2 3 

My friendly staff I've taken, The birds arc floating o'er Die, 

My little bundle tied, In circles lioht and gay; 

And now I'm free to wander, They soar and sing above me, 

Where the road may guide. High and far away. 

4 

The lovely May is coming, 

All decked in glittering green, 
Ye flowers from grove and meadow, 

Come, to meet ytfur queen! 



LESSON XII. 



4^-4—-—— 


+ 




— 1 — ■„ — - 






gM 




—0 — — * 




^ f j 9 




:— 1— rl 1 I — 1 — k~ 


i-r-^-ft 









LESSON XIII. 



90 



COME SEEK THE BOWER. 

Allegro. 1st Voice. 




Biirfiz^z 



ZTZM 

zfe 



e^-l P>~ L -! p . I j g-jg-^^-jg^X-!. — | ^—X 

the ro - ! 
ens, join t 



1. Come, seek the bow'r, the ro - sy bow'r, I 

2. Ye youths and maid-ens, join the song, I 



love its cool re - 
love a cheer- ful 



— l-f 



is 



-1—1 — 



treat 5 The 
glee 5 The 



1 



_i — 1^ — 1 — 



5-z^|z=3==z]z|i::z3 



sun is high, and great his pow'r, And weary are our feet, 
e-choes shall our notes pro-long, Then, come, and sing with me. 



, 1st voice. Then 
1 2d voice. And 



.53 _ p?— 5^ 

4 ' 



Zzjzf:z:jz| : 



2d voice repeat. 

Edward, and Emma, and Joseph, and Sarah, and Kit-ty the beau-ti - ful maid ; ) 
VVil-liam, and Ma ry ; and Rob-ert, and Ellen, and Richard the call o bey'd 3 ) 



Chorus 

HK — 



z£: 



Then Edward, and Emma, and Jo-seph, and Sarah, And Kit- ty the beautiful 



COME SEEK THE BOWER. — (Continued.) 



91 



maid, And William, and Ma-ry, and Rob-ert, and El-len, And Richard the call o 




T-=— ^ — r— r'T - j — i-^T-i — i I 

fazz==z4^ij:z:i::::f;vizzz==5.5i::-rpr5^=g 



beyed, the call o - - - beyed, 



& 1 * l " 

the call o - - - beyed. 



. . They 
They 



T" ~~ p~T~ T W W~ y ~^T 

xTffp.^ ^ #-^p^^-#-h-~^-^-#-#-+ -m-\ — m-\ — &- &- 




^ P b-J 

sought the bower, the rosy bower, And sat in the plea - sant 
sung a song-, a cheerful song-, And sat in the plea - sant 



y 

shade, They 
shade, They 



zr:c: 



tzzr- 2 * 



1 




^ «<# lib* /?s « tempo. 



-13—® — *< 

— h- 

■PH P*—* **4— 



zzfzzjzz^Jz^zfzzfz -ri-'Tr ~ i — rr ~ 
z| :g::^4(yz#z#z# ^zgzj^g ft 



& * * ZmT P 

sought the bow'r, the ro - sy bower, And sat in the plea - sant shade, 
sung a song-, a cheer-ful song, And sat in the plea - sant shade. 



^*E*ZZZZZ 



92 



iL Andante 



SINGING AND STUDY. 



WW 



& & & * 

1. Let us glad-ly 



^_ 



y r ^ L l P 

_i3 ^ ^ & i 

sing - ing, Pour our joys a - long: 
^. . 



J 



I i r i 
^ ^ ^ 

Let us danc-ing, spring - ing, Be 



H h— L-r-— j£ «g-~L_#JL_ I 



& & 



hap-py throng. 



— Q — @ — 



1 



Music! 'tis a treasure, 
Rich as Eden's bloom; 

Fill'd with all that's pleasure, 
Free from all that's gloom. 



Let us all be cheerly, 
Let us all rejoice; 

Love our studies dearly, 
Making them our choice. 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 



at 



Let your plea-sure, Wait your lei - sure, But your work do 




i 



-E~t-r r r r t r 



— o 



not de - lay, No, no, no, no, no, no, no, do not de — lay. 



Allegro. 



THE HOBBY HORSE. 



93 



1. Hop, hop, hop! 

2 ;-z - 



I* K £ 

Go and nev - er stop: Where 'tis smooth and 



«>: -• : P_ j IT f 



— sjfc |V— ^ 1^- -i | ^ — r — — N — ^ — >^~- fV— ^ ^--i 1 - 

I 1 f _ <p_ . _ 1_I | 1 J-.^_g_^_»_ J__ i 

1 1 ^-*- g-fir- 1 k ^ I 1 -M ^— M— 



P i* ' I* ^ £ £ ** + * + 

where 'tis stony, Trudge along my lit-tle po-ney, Go, and never 



stop. 



^ 0- 



-Q -l. 



mm 




Hop, hop, hop, hop, hop 



4= 



Hey, hey, hey! 

Go along I say: [stumble, 
Don't you kick and don't you 
Don't you tire and don't you grum- 

Go along I say, [ble, 

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey! 



Jump, jump, jump! 

Don't you hit that stump! 
Never will I cease to ride you, 
'Till I farther yet have tried you: 

Shun, I say, that stump! 

Jump, jump, jump, jump, jump. 



94 



Andante* 



CHANGE. (Parting at School) hijimel. 

3j 



— ^ — — 9 ® — & — & o — % a 



i 

1. We can - not re - main so for 



ev er, Here 



4 



! : | ,. 



ft r~f 

un- der the changea - ble 



Moon; .... The flow - ers that 



:i^i=3lzSz=:z: : 



®-^-&-\-Q~ 



i 

r 

bloom sweetly round us, 



I 



w rf 



I 



Arc des-tined to with - er full 



9^ 



'izi^zzili^zz^t^zfz:?;!:- 



mi 



Are destined to with- er full soon 

zcx:z 



: 



CHANGE. 



2 

Then since we must surely be parted, 
We'll cleave to what's purest and best; 

For this will forever unite us, 

Though far in the east or the west. 

tn 
O 

And when we are far from each other, 
Our hearts, they shall ever be near! 

The blessing that lights on a brother, 
To all, yes, to all shall be dear. 



SENTENCE. 



to 



■0- 



T~rr 



-1- 



fiir iii 

Be to oth-ers kind and true, As you'd have them be to you; 



-- f- 



*=afc 



Nev-er do nor say to men, That which you'd not take again. 



LESSON XIV. 







i 



9G 



NEW YEAR SONG. 



Moderate 




? I ! ^ 1 i 

mourn ; But all our faults we'll leave behind us, With the year that now is gone. 



The stern old year! I'm glad he's parted! 

And yet I loved him well; 
He brought the best, while we weak hearted, 

Read wrongly what befel. 

He loved us, though he brought us sorrow; 

He always taught in love; 
We left the lesson 'till the morrow, 

And so did not improve. 

Now Thou art come, with smiles so pleasant; 

But say, canst thou do this: — 
Bring back our earliest new year's present, 

The days of childhood's bliss. 

Who sends thee doubtless sends thee giving 

As good as we can crave; 
Young year! we hope we may be living, 

To bear thee to thy grave. 



COME AND SEE HOW HAPPILY. English Melody, 07 

Allegretto. 




Al- ways join-ing cheer- ful - ly In school or play; 
Youth is but a pass-ing flower, Which blooms and dies ; 




In our books and sports combined, Many are the joys we find. 
But with stu dy and with song, Time with us still glides a - long 

Come and see, &c. 



LESSON XV. 




BLISS IS HOVERING. 



Allegretto. 

i. * 



f^z=jzzttzri=^=0= z^pzzzzz ==:t 
I 5 I 5 i r » 1 1 ! 



1. Bliss is hovering, smil-ing eve 



3C 



ry - 
— *B- T 



yhere, 





iUS. i "S 



glassy fountain, Bliss is hovering, smiling eve-ry 



where, 



zee 



ttzt 



I 



Innocence unseen is ever near; 
In the tall tree-top it lingers, 
In the nest of feathered singers; 

Innocence unseen is ever near. 



BLISS IS IIOVF.RIXG. 



90 



Pleasure echoes, echoes far and near; 

From the green bank deck'd with flowers, 
Sunny hills and pleasant bowers, 

Pleasure echoes, echoes far and near. 

4 

Up, and weave us now a flowery crown; 
See the blossoms all unfolding, 
Each its beauteous station holding; 

Up, and weave us now a flowery crown. 

5 

Go ye forth and join the May-day throng; 
Sings the cuckoo by the river, 
In the breeze the young leaves quiver; 

Go ye forth and join the Slay-day throng. 



IUBHPJJ 1 1X1 



ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 

^ — — — — ^ 

>1 




To the 



praise . 



%. 0—P-: 


—0 fi- 

' 1 \ 







Q ^1 - 






^ — u 


■ -LJ — 









For it 



bie 





& Q - 


— 9 — 9— 




-q : 




t 








O 


— a J 





no - ble 



thing. 



100 



s 



THE GROVE. 



C. M. VON WEBER. 



Allegro* 


Original 
1 1 Pjl 


<ey E [? for men's 
r-H /^n 


voices. 


_j |_ T 




— H = 

._G p2 j — 

— — 1 0- 


— H — — 

JGL p? 1.. 


-O — P 1-- 


— © = ^— ■ 

p? r *— . 

::c tzztr-;: 




v -o h~ 1 

i 


1 







1. The grove, 

2. The world, 



the grove, 
the world, 



the grove, 
the world, 



inf. 



the grove, 
the world, 



The 
The 



± 



f P f P 
— 0— f— H h— 1 H 1 -0—0—+- 1 



fresh and love- ly grove, The grove, the grove, where e - choes sound, where 
great and spacious world, The world, the world, is our a - bode, is 




e - choes sound, 
our a - bode, 



The grove where e - choes sound, 
The world is our a - bode, 

7*~-zZ-:t>—p 1 - 



The 
The 



m 



Sz:|z?z:^:5z^:$i:qi._ 

— ! 1 L H W — W — P- — — & — — — m-\ J 

grove where echoes sound. We hark to the note of the morn ing horn, We 
world is our a - bode. We wan-der a - way through the fields so fair, We 




s wan-der a - way through the fields so fair, We 



THE GROVE. 

> 



101 



> S s s . s s ♦ !♦ g s • 5 5 ♦ ♦ .♦-••..1 



v> & p 



— h 



u ^ ^ 

hark to the note of the morning horn, Where flowerets and roses the grove adorn, Where 
wander away through the fields so fair. Our cho-rus is mer-ri - !y sounding there, Out 

— — i — ^-^-i — p* *~ist-d--d I — +! — &—*-\ — &—&—\ 1 H* — 1 — -f 



— # — 4----{ — — j h-0^r\ fv— + 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

flowerets and roses the grove adorn, The grove, the grove, the grove the grove, The 
cho-rus is mer-rily sounding there, The world, the world, the world, the world, The 



^zpzpzpzpfzpzpzpzpzptzzix: 

1 is*-**-! - ! h 1 -^M- 

^-^-^-^-^^-^-^-^ |-}-- 



jV 



•? r ^ r i i i 



U ,5 

grove where 
world is 



e - choes sound, The 
our a - bode, The 

— j — ; 




grove where 
world is 



choes sound, 
a - - bode. 



a — * 



_4_ 



LESSON XVI. 



35: 



:"1 - - : 














1' 










1_ 



1 



a 



THE SWISS TOY GIRL. jno. barnett. 



5 



ve come a-cros3 the sea, 
For a bro-ther dear to me ! 



qzzzjzzzc 



ipzzt 



I've braved eve-ry danger, ) r^^^ n 
From Swiss land a ranger. J 



*=±z 




js> 4: U. I i__ — ZJ — X 1 — 4 — L ^ _^ X 



ty, as-sist, and pro-tect a poor stranger, And buy a lit - tie 



zzsi^zzjzzrjZiaz^za. 



:xzqzzizzr-i: 



t=t= 



ii 



:z: 



z3 



toy of poor Rose of Lu-cerne, a 



^EzH 



rtzzgzzjfc 



:azz« 



lit - tie 

— I 



toy, a lit - tie 



0- L - 



'jt=3t=Jtt 







toy, Then buy a lit - tie toy of poor Rose of Lu-cerne. 



3t:»_zff::zz; 



— 0- 



=t=t 



-+■ 



:z4zzj|zizp 



THE SWISS TOY GIRL. 



103 



Come round me, ladies fair, 

I've ribbands and laces, 
I've trinkets, rich and rare, 

To add to the graces, 
Of waist, neck, or arm, 

Or your sweet pretty faces. 
Then buy, &,c. 

3 

I've paint, and I've perfume, 

For those who may choose them; 

Young ladies, I presume 
You all will refuse them; 

The bloom on your cheek 

Shows that you never use them. 
Yet buy a little toy, &c. 

4 

I've a cross to make you smart, 
On your breast you may bear it, 

Just o'er your little heart, 
I advise you to wear it, 

And I hope that no other 

Cross e'er will come near it. 

So buy a little toy of poor Rose of Lucerne- 
Yes, yes, I do, :|| 
So buy, &c. 



LESSON XVII. 



§ 4 




U 

— U 












=0= 










; W* | 1 








L *m d J 





34 



Allegretto. 



IN THE COTTAGE. 



# — i — ^ -^-a-i 



5 H- -f i- "p ^r 



3 



■r 

I (In 



Ours 



. , • • . i 

the cot - tage where we dwell, We have led 
are joys which none can tell, Who en - gage 




• # -« 1 1 j 1- 1 f— 

;\i $ !-} «.!. 

jJ 1 L___L_JL_L_ 1 . 



state. 



Yet con - tent - ed 



«>:* * ' * 



with our lot, We en - vy not 



the 




IN THE COTTAGE. 



105 



o 

Blest with life, and blest with health, 
We desire no splendid home ; 

Nor, to be the slaves of wealth, 
Do we ever wish to roam. 

Though but lowly be our state, Sec. 

3 

All the sweets of wealth will pall: — 
Honest hearts and liberty. 

In our cot are with them all — 
Home is home where'er it be. 

Though but lowly be our state, &c. 



LESSON XVIII. 





--4 — = — 


■MC^ 1 








B-^ — 1 

-o 


. m 


1 — 


— h — 1 







ROUND FOR THREE VOICES. 

White sand and gray sand, White sand and gray sand. Who'll buy my white saud 1 



00 TO OUR MOTHER. 



WORDS BY PFEIFFER MUSIC BY NAGELI. 

P 



<7 



-j — -- fr- 



f 



1. Mo-ther! Mo - ther. Soft is 



morn 



mg dew, 




^ 1— m 0- 



Soft the cloud of sil - - 



— I- 





ir 1 P * y 



1 %- * 

Moth-er's hand, That still hath hold 




*— »— 

tzzspizpz: 



smile so bland, A-long life's path of 



TO OUR MOTHER. 



10: 




* — ? — H — ^ — d F 
=z=piz=gzifz±z?z| = ?-i=|=:. i j: 



:=t±=£:! 



flowers — A - - long life's path ot flowers. 



-r-g.— 

1 I f L H — 



zzz*: 



2. Mother! Mother! deep the heart is stirred, 
When the winds thro' woods are heard; 
But deeper stirs the Mother's tone, 

The tender voice we love, 

That sings to us of spring-time flown, 

Of hope and heaven above. 

3. Mother! Mother! beautiful is spring, 
Sunshine gilds the blossoming; 

But far more beautiful her smile, 
That lights our eyes with hope, 
That bids our budding joys the while, 
With livelier courage ope. 

4. Mother! Mother! sweet the taste of flowers, 
To the bee that sips for hours; 

But sweeter far the rapturous bliss,- — 
It thrills thro' every chord, 
When comes to us a mother's kiss, 
Our most desired reward. 

5. Mother! Mother! prizes more than one, 
Greet us when our duty's done; 

But all of them are nought beside 
The pleasure pure and sweet, 
To be a mother's fondest pride, 
And make her joy complete. 



108 



THE REAPERS 



-^-•fi^-r- 



■ J J JfF^-i— f 



1. The sic - kle's edge 



I 

is 



sharp 



ened, The 



at 




reap- ing men are come, 



So 



gay and frol - ic 





1 



-# _ 



1=1= 



The morn-ing birds are wak - ing, The 



gag* 

* — 



— I — h 







f 1 +-JL * i 


4 1 W — 1 

yel- low ears are 


shak - ing, For 


L £ ^_J- 

-O- -0- 1 1 

^ p ' p 

now is the har-vest 


^ . 

^ j L. 1 1 

j ^ 1 




1 1— 

1 1 





THE REAPERS. 




Up, while the morning breezes, 
So fresh around us blow; 
To the fields away we'll go; 
The lark is homeward springing, 
Our merry songs are ringing. 
For now is the, &,c. 



We'll work 'till evening's glimmer, 
Shall on the steeple play; 
And then the moonlight ray, 
Our homeward path shall lighten, 
And round our garners brighten. 
For now is the, &.c. 




110 



Allegro. 



FIRST DAY OF MAY. c. m. von wjbbeb. 



.^fzTf*z** > : g.-l:;S:||zzg~- 

a _±_ L-P j 0— 



u 1 b 

How sweet is the pleasure on 
With gar -lands of flow-ers our 



May's love-ly 
tern - pies a - 




morn - ing, To 
dorn - ing ; And 



zzjzz£zzM:ztz£z>: 
zez*z=#zt:#z*z*z: 



— j — m — B r -J — N N r p jT-^g^ T -J^^ f - f* % 1 — IVHV 

h ~-^-j K ci4__^_^_i h ---_^_i — i-j — lJ-i — 



rove o'er the meadows all blithesome and 
danc-ing, and sing-ingwnh high mer-ry 



free ! ) 
glee. S 



There's pleasure in 



^zi=lzi^zs=S«=erf^zz^z:^f:|:i|z:izl 



I I** 

freedom, what -ev - er the 



sea-son, That makes eve-ry 



ob - ject look 



:z*zzEzpz£z±:?z?z?zJ 



z-zrz = ]z:z^:qzT.- 5 ; 



-^-^ 1 N~-rV-r— | 



i 5 



H -r — I — F*- t- — I — 1 gg- — Q 

|^zznfz*£*E*zf:fE:*E:^iEzti 



love-ly and fair ; 



Then sure-ly for 



plea-sure we 



have a 



FIRST DAY OF MAY. 



Ill 



i I i I ^ ^ I k* nta»< * \ * 



i ^ ^ i ^ ^ I k* k* 

rea-son, For free-dom has blest us and 



k* I ^ 

us from care. La 



rea-son, For free-dom has blest us and I reed us from care. La 
ySTITu-^-* T *-*-*-T &-&—r T -\ 

! *-*—\- J f~| &-0*— \~i ; [•-' 

^ — s ^ — N . La 



_Ji_^ _ 1 ^ -yd— i - j > r- 

m -0-0-3-0 -<&-* - ~ 0-0 — -L-i — 1 — i *• 



r p P j k 
+ + If * 

la la la la la la 



(a fa 



la la 



la la 



la la la la la la 



la la la la la la 



i^zpz^zszpz^: 

-i — **-k*M — 

la la la la la la 




I 

la 



la la 



} — H ^& > i^ss^-qh- 



stzz -^-g — ^& 

0-0 0— 



la la 



la la 



Jlz^z®_z_ 



la la la la 



la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la la 

§§6 




g g ■# 

P u 

la la la la la 



la 



i 

^ [For o/.^cr verses 3ee n*xt page j 



[8] 



-i*-**-^-k*- 

ia la la la la 



Hi 



112 FIRST DAY OF MAY. 



2 

O let us this May-day dispel all our sadness, 
And give to the winds every sorrowing cloud; 

Let's fill up our pleasure, and pour forth our gladness, 
In songs that shall echo them loud and more loud. 
There's pleasure in freedom, &c. 

3 

All nature in beauty and splendor is shining, 
The hill and the valley are lovely and bright; 

From earliest morning to evening's declining, 

There's naught that appears, but it gives us delight. 
There's pleasure in freedom, &,c. 




i 



MAKLOW. C. M. 



r 113 




1. Thee will I bless, O Lord, my God, To thee my voice I'll rai*o, 

2. My soul shall glo-iy in the Lord, His wondrous acts proclaim, 




i — , — , — , — 

* * ^ j - 



-+- 



L -g-g 



i ' 1 

For - ever spread thy fame abroad, And dai-ly sing thy praise 
Oh let us now his love re-cord, And ma qui - fy his name. 



ROUND FOR TWO, THREE, FOUR, FIVE, SIX, SEVEN 
OR EIGHT VOICES. 



^4- — > j T -*— 

Spir - its bright! 



L -L_^ 

Make our la - bors light. 



~%7~ 



rtzjt f i rl~n 



^ — ,** 



# # 



Teach U3 all the pleasing art, To do our work with cheerful hoart 
C81 



114 



SICILY. 8s & 7s. 



1. Lord, dis-miss us with thy bless-ingj Fill our hearts with joy and peace } 



i Let us, each thy love pos -sess-ing, Tri- umph in re-deem-ing grace : 
1 Oh ! re - fresh us, Oh ! re - fresh us, Trav'ling thro' this wil-der-ness. 



PS 



2 



ROUND FOR FOUR VOICES. 




& —0 



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QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMKNTS OF MUSIC 



I. GENERAL DIVISION OF THE SUBJECT. 

1. How many distinctions exist in the nature of musical sounds ? 

2. What is the first? Second ? Third ? 

3. How many departments are there in the elementary principles of music* 

4. What is the first department called ? Second? Third? 

5. What is that distinction in the nature of musical sounds, on which rhythm 

is founded ? Melody ? Dynamics ? [Povver ? 

6. What is that department called, that relates to the length of sounds ? Pitch P 

7. In how many ways do musical sounds differ ? 

8. Hovv many essential properties have musical sounds ? What are they ? 

9. What is the subject of rhythm ? Melody? Dynamics? 

10. If sounds differ from one another only as it respects their length, is the dif- 

ference Rhythmical, Melodic, or Dynamic? 

11. If sounds differ with respect to their pitch, is the difference Rhythmical, 

Melodic, or Dynamic. 

12. If sounds differ with respect to their power, is it a Rhythmical, Melodic, or 

Dynamic difference ? 



II. RHYTHM. DIVISIONS OF TIME, &,C. 

1. How is the length of sounds regulated, (or governed) in music ? 

2. What are the portions of time called into which music is divided ? 

3. What portions of time are smaller than measures ? 

4. Hovv many kinds of measure are there ? 

5. How many parts has double measure ? Triple ? Quadruple ? Sextuple i 

6. On which part of the measure is double time accented ? Triple ? Quad- 

ruple ? Sextuple ? 

7. What is the character called which is used for separating the measures? 
S. What distinguishes one kind of time from another? 

9. In beating time, how many motions has double time ? Triple ? Quadru- 
ple ? Sextuple ? 
10. What is the use of beating time ? 



III. RHYTHM. OF NOTES. 

1. What are those cha racters called, which represent the length of sounds ? 

2. Are notes rhythmical, melodic, or dynamic characters? Why? 



118 



QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC, 



8. How many kinds of notes are there in common use ? 

4. What is the longest note called ? The next, &e. 
6. How much does a dot add to the length of a note ? 

5. What do notes represent ? What are notes for ? 



IV. RHYTHM. VARIETIES OF MEASURE. 

1. How many kinds of time are there ? 

2. How many varieties in each kind of time ? 

3. How are the different varieties of time obtained ? 
: 4. By which figure is the kind of time designated ? 

5. By which figure is the variety of time designated ? 

' 6. What is the upper figure (numerator) for? 

7. What is the lower figure (denominator) for ? 

8. Do the different varieties of time differ to the. ear, or to the eye only ? 

9. What does the numerator express (or number) ? 

10. What does the denominator express (or denominate) ? 

11. Suppose the figures to be ^, what two notes will fill a measure ? What 

one note ? What four ? &c. 

Note. — Similar questions may also be asked in reference to the different kinds and varie- 
ties of time. 

V. MELODY. THE SCALE. 

t. What is the second distinction in musical sounds ? 

2. What is the department called, arising out of this distinction? 

3. Of what does melody treat ? 

4. What is that series of sounds called, which lies at the foundation of melody? 

5. How many sounds are there in the scale ? 

6. How do we designate, or speak of the sounds of the scale? Numerals. 

7. What is the first sound of the scale called ? One. What the second? Two, &c. 

8. What is the difference of pitch between two sounds called? 

9. How many intervals are there in the scale ? 

10. How many kinds of intervals are there in the scale ? 

11. What are the larger intervals called ? Smaller? 

12. How many tones are there in the scale ? 13. How many semitones ? 
14. What is the interval from one to two ? Two to three ? Three to four? &c. 

VI. MELODY.- STAFF, LETTERS, SYLLAELES, CLEFS. 

1. What is that character called, which represents the pitch of sounds? 

2. Is the staff a rhythmical, melodic, or dynamic character ? Why ? 



QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



3. How many lines arc there in the staff? 4. How many spaces ? 

5. What is each line and space of the staff called? * 
6'. How many degrees does the stall* contain ? 

7. (Pointing to the stalT,) Which line is this? Space ? &cT 

8. (Pointing to the staff,) Which degree of the staff is this? &c. 

9. Wnat is the space above the staff called? Space below? 

10. If lines are added below the staff, what aic they called? 

11. If added above the staff, what are they called? 

12. Where upon the staff is one usually written ? Ans. Added line below, — 

Wnere two ? Three ? &,c. 

13. What letter is one ? two ? three ? &c. 

14. What syllable is one ? two ? three ? &c 

15. On what other degree of the staff, besides the added line below, is one 

often written ? Ans. Second space. 

16. Ho w can we tell whether one be written on the added line below, or on 

the second space ? 

17. How many clefs are there? 

18. What are they called? Ans. G clef (treble) and F clef (base). 

19. What does the G clef signify ? Ans. G second line. 

20. What does the F clef signify ? Ans. F fourth line. 

21. If the G clef is used, where must one be written? 

22. If the F clef is used, where must one be written ? 

23. What letter is one ? What syllable is one ? What numeral is D? What 

numeral is Re ? What syllable is D ? What numeral is Sol ? What let- 
ter is 5 ? What syllable is 5 ? &c. &c &c. 



VII. RHYTHM. - — RHYTHMICAL CLASSIFICATION, OR FORMS OF MEASURE. 

1. When in \ time there are four quarters in a measure, what is the form (cr 

relation) of the measure called? Ans. Primitive. 

2. Why is it called the primitive form of the measure ? Ans. Because it is 

the most simple, easy and natural; or, that which the figures express, 

3. What are all other forms of the measure called? 

4. How are derived forms obtained from the primitive ? 

5. How many derivatives are there in the first class ? Second ? Third } 

6. What is peculiar to the derivatives of the first class ? Second? 

7. What is peculiar to the first derivative of the third class ? 

8. Why is the second derivative in the third class called irregular? 

9. How can derived forms be reduced to primitive ? 

10. When a note commences on an unaccented part of a measure, and is con- 
tinued on an accented part of the measure, what is it called? Ans. Syn- 
copated n^te. 



120 



QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



11. In which class are syncopated notes found ? 

Note — It is thought unnecessary to repeat the questions for different kinds, or varieties of 
measure, as ^. |, %, &c. If the principle be understood, it can easily be applied to these 
and other varieties of measure. 



VIII. RHYTHM. RESTS. 

1. When a measure or part of a measure is passed over in silence, what is it 

called ? 

2. What are those characters called, which indicate silence ? 

3. Are rests rhythmical, melodic, or dynamic characters? Why? 

4. How many kinds of rests are there ? 

Note. — Exercise at present, only on whole, half, and quarter rests. 



IX. DYNAMICS. DYNAMIC DEGREES. 

1. What is the third distinction in musical sounds ? 

2. What is the department called, which arises out of this distinction ? 

3. W T hat is the subject of dynamics ? 

4. When a sound is neither loud nor soft, what is it called ? How marked ? 

5. When a sound is soft, what is it called ? How marked ? 

6. When a sound is loud, what is it called ? How marked ? 
7 If a sound is very soft, what is it called ? How marked : 

8. If a sound is very loud, what is it called ? How marked ? 

9. What does Piano, or P signify ? 10. What does Forte, or F signify? 
11. What does Mezzo, or M signify ? 12. What does Pianissimo or PP signify ? 
13. What does Fortissimo, or FF signify ? 



X. MELODY. SKIPS. 

1. In the use of one and three, how many changes may be produced? 

2. What are they? Aas. 1 3, and 3 1. Sing them. 

8. How many changes may be produced with 1, 3 and 5, provided we com- 
mence with 1. 

4. What are they ? Ans. 13 5, and 15 3. Sing them. 

5. How many changes may be produced, beginning with 3 ? 
C. What are they? A as, 3 15, and 3 5 1. Sing them. 

7. How many changes, beginning with 5 ? 

8. What are they? Ans, 5 13, and 5 3 1. Sing them. 

9. How many changes may be produced with 13 5 and 8, beginning with 1 ? 
10. What are they ? Sing them. 



QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OF Ml 121 

H. How many, beginning with 3? 12. What are they ? Sing them. 

13. How many, beginning with 5? 14. What an- they ? Sing them. 

15. How many, beginning with 8? lb'. What arc they? Sing them. 

17. To what sound does 7 naturally lead ? Am. 8. 

18. What sound must we think of, to enable us to sing seven right ? Ans. 8. 

19. What sound is a guide to 7. 20. To what sound does four lead ? Ans. 3. 
21. What sound is a guide to 4 ? 22. What sound will guide to 2 i \ Ans. 1 or 3. 
23. What sound will guide to 6 ? Ans. 5. 



XI. MELODY. SCALE EXTENDED. 

1. When sounds are sung higher than eight, how is eight to be regarded? 

2. When sounds are sung lower than one, how is one to be regarded ? 

3. What sound of the upper scale is 9 ? 10 : &c. 



XII. MELODY. CHROMATIC SCALE. 

1. Between what sounds of the scale, may intermediate sounds be produced? 

Ans. 1 and 2, 2 and 3, 4 and 5, 5 and 6, and 6 and 7. 

2. Why can there not be an intermediate sound between 3 and 4, and 7 and 8 ? 

3. What is the sign of elevation called, by which intermediate sounds are 

indicated ? 

4. What is the sign of depression called, by which intermediate sounds are 

indicated ? 

5. When a sharp is placed before a note, how much higher is its sound ? 

6. When a fl.it is placed before a note, how much lower is its sound ? 

7. What is the intermediate sound between I and 2 called, when it derives its 

name from 1 ? Ans. #1. 8. What letter ? Ans. C#. 
9. W r hat is it called, when it derives its name from 2 ? Ans. |?2. 
10. What letter ? Ans. D?. 
Note — Ask similar questions with respect to the other sounds, 
i. On what degree of the staff is J}1 written ? jj2 ? #4 ? j}5 ? jj6 ? 

12. On what degree of the staff is y2 written I £>3 ? \>5 ? ^6 ? t> 7 ■ 

13. What syllable is applied to |}1 , &c ? 14. What syllable is applied to ? 7 ? &c. 
5. W T hen all the intermediate sounds are included in the scale, how many 

are there altogether ? Ans. 13. 16. How many intervals ? 

7. What are the intervals called ? 

8. What is a scale of thirteen sounds, and twelve intervals of a semitone each, 

called? Ans. Chromatic* scale. 

9. What is the common scale of eight sounds called ? Ans. Diatonicf scale. 

* From the Greek Chroma, signifying color ; probably because the notes representing the 
ntermediate, or artificial sounds, were differently colored. 
\ From the Greek Via through, and Tonos, a tone. 



1 2 C 2 QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 

20. By what character is the ascending chromatic scale formed ? 

21. By what character is the descending chromatic scale formed ? 

22. Are flats and sharps, rhythmical, melodic, or dynamic characters ? 

23. Does a sharped sound naturally lead upwards, or downwards ? 

24. To what does tJ2 lead ? &c &c. 

25. Does a flatted sound naturally lead upwards, or downwards? 

26. To what does ?7 lead ? &c. 27. Which is the guide to a sharped sound ? 
28: Which is the guide to a flatted sound ? 29. What is the guiae to £4 ? &c. 

30. What is the guide to ?7 ? &c. 

31. How far does the influence of a sharp, or flat, extend? Ans. Through the 

measure in which it occurs. 

32. Under what circumstances does the influence of a sharp, or flat, extend 

beyond the measure in which it occurs ? Ans. W'hen the same sound is 
continued from measure to measure. 

33. W T hen it is necessary to take away the effect of a sharp or flat, what char- 

acter is used ? 

XIII. MELODY. DIATONIC INTERVALS 

1. When two sounds are both the same pitch, what are they called? Ans. Unison. 

2. When we proceed from any note to that which is written on the next degree 

of the staff, what is the interval called ? Ans. Second. 

3. When we skip over one degree of the staff, what is the interval called ? 

Ans. Third. 4. When we skip two degrees? Fourth. 
5. When we skip three degiees ? Fifth. 6. When we skip four degrees ? Sixth. 

7. When we skip five degrees ? Seventh. 

8. When we skip six degrees ? Eighth, or Octave. 



XIV. ^MELODY.— MAJOR AND MINOR INTERVALS. 

1. If a second consists of a semitone, w T hat is it called ? Ans. Minor Second. 

2. If a second consists of a tone, what is it called ? Ans. Major Second. 

3. If a third consists of a tone and semitone, what is it called ? Ans. Minor Third. 

4. If a third consists of two tones, w r hat is it called ? Ans. Major Third. 

5. If a fourth consists of two tones and one semitone, what is it called ? 

Ans. Perfect Fourth. 

6. If a fourth consist of three tones, what is it called ? Ans. Sharp Fourth. 

7. If a fifth consists of two tones and two semitones, what is it called ? 

Ans. Flat Fifth. 

8. If a fifth consists of three tones, and one semitone, what is it called ? 

Ans. Perfect Fifth. 

9. If a sixth consist of three tones and two semitones, what is it called ? 

Ans. Minor Sixth. 
10. If a sixth consists of four tones and one semitone, what is it called ? 

AnS. Major Sixth. * This chap, may be onutted. 



QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OE Ml !2 S 

11. If a seventh consists of four tones and two semitones, what is it called : 

Ans. Flat Seventh. 

12. If a seventh consists of five tones and one semitone, what is it ralh <1 r 

A as. Sharp Seventh. 

13. If an octave consists of fi ve tones and two semitones, what is it called ? 

Ans. Perfect Octave. 

Minor Intervals altered to Major. 

14. If the lower sound of any Minor interval be Hatted, what does the interval 

become I Ans. Major. 

15. If the upper sound of any Minor interval be sharped, what does it become ? 

Ans. Major. 

Major Intervals altered to Minor. 

16. If the lower sound of any Major interval be sharped, what does the inter- 

val become ? A is. Minor. 

17. If the upper sound of any Minor interval be flatted, what does the interval 

become ? Ans. Minor. 

Extreme Sharp Intervals. 

18. If the lower sound of any Major interval be flatted, what does the interval 

become ? Ans. Extreme sharp, or Superfluous. 

19. If the upper sound of any M for interval be sharped, what does the inter- 

val become ? Ans. Extreme sharp, or Supeifluous. 

Extreme Flat Intervals. 

20. If the lower sound of any Minor interval be sharped, what does the inter- 

val become ? Ans. Extreme flat, or Diminished. 

21. If the upper sound of any Minor interval be flatted, what does the interval 

become ? Ans. Extreme flat, or Diminished. 



XV. MELODY. — FIRST TRANSPOSITION OF THE SCALE BY FIFTHS. 

1. When is the scale said to be in the key of C ? 

2. Why is the scale said to be in the key of C, when C is taken as one ? 

Ans. Because one is the foundation, or basis, of the scale. 

3. Suppose G be taken as one, in what key would the scale be then ? 

4. What is meant by the key of C ? D ? *E ? F ? &c. 

5. When any other letter than C is taken as one, what is said of the scale ? 

6. In what key is the scale, when in its natural position ? 

7. In transposing the scale, what must we be careful to preserve unaltered? 

Ans. The order of the intervals. 

8. What must the interval always be, from one to two ? Two to three, &c. 

9. What is the interval, always, from C to D ? D to E ? &c. 

10. How can the order of the intervals be preserved in transposing the scale ? 

Ans. By substituting sharped, or flatted, for natural letters. 

11. What is the first transposition of the scale usually made ? 



124 



QUESTIONS ON THE ELEMENTS OF MUSIC. 



12 How much higher is G, than C ? 13. How much lower is G. than C ? I 

14. What is the signature to the key of G ? 15. What is the sig. to the key of C ? 

16. Why is F sharped in the key of G ? 

17. What sound has the key of G, that the key of C has not ? 

18. What sound has the key of C, that the key of G has not ? 

19. How many sounds have the keys of C and G in common ? 

20. What letter is one, in the key of C ? 21. What sound is C, in the key of G ? 
22; What letter is two, in the key of C ? 23. What sound is D, in the key of G ? 

Not*;. — Similar questions oii the other letters and sounds. 

24. In transposing the scale from C to G,what sound is found to be wrong? Ans. 4. 

25. Is it too high, or too low ? 

26. What must we do with the fourth in this case ? Ans. Sharp it. 

27. What does this sharped fourih become in the new key of G? Ans. 7. 

28. What effect does sharping the 4th have on the scale? Ans. It transposes it a 5th. 

29. What must be done in order to transpose the scale a 5th ? Ans. Sharp the 4th. 



XVI. SECOND TRANSPOSITION OF THE SCALE BY FIFTHS. 

1. If the scale be transposed fiom G a fifth higher, to what letter will it go?. J 

2. In order to transpose the scale a fifth, what must be done ? Ans. Sharp > 

the fourth. 3. What is the fourth in the key of G ? 

4. What letter must be sharped, then, in transposing from G to D ? 

5. What is the signature to the key of D ? Ans, Two sharps. 

6. What letters are sharped ? Why ? 

7. How much higher is the key of G, than the key of C ? 

8. How much higher is the key of D, than the key of G? 

9. What letter is six, in the key of C ? 10. What sound is A, in the key of G ? ' 

11. What sound is A, in the key of D ? 

No tk. — Similar questions should be asked of other letters and sounds. 

12. What sound has the key of G, that the key of D has not ? 

13. What sound has the key of D, that the key of G has not ? 

14. How many sounds have the keys of G and D in common ? 

15. 'How many sounds have the keys of C and D in common ? 



XVII. THIRD TRANSPOSITION OF THE SCALE BY FIFTHS. 

1. If the scale be transposed from D a fifth, to what letter will it go ? 

2. In order to transpose the scale a fifth higher, what must be done ? Ans. 

Sharp the fourth. 3. What is four in the key of D ? 

4. What letter, then, must be sharped in transposing from D to A ? 

5. What is the signature to the key of A ? 6. What letters are sharped ? 

7. How much higher is the key of A, than D ? 

8. How much higher is the key of D, than G ? 



^ 7 




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